Thursday, January 14, 2010

2010 No. 1

Stimulus was only a temporary boost to personal income

The Stimulus Didn’t Work

by John F. Cogan, John B. Taylor, Volker Wielandvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Government transfers and rebates were just pebbles in a pond. Private-sector resilience made the real waves. By John F. Cogan, John B. Taylor, and Volker Wieland.

We’re Not All Dismal

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Some economists can’t see mankind for the math. The latest Nobel Prize went to two who focus on how humans actually behave. By David R. Henderson.

Myths of the Multiplier

by Robert J. Barro, Charles J. Redlickvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

The administration promised that every dollar of federal spending would produce more than a dollar of economic growth. Look at the data—it hasn’t worked out that way. By Robert J. Barro and Charles J. Redlick.

The rising tides of deficit spending may do more to drown growth than everything that went before.

Demanding Debt Discipline

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

The rising tides of deficit spending may do more to drown growth than everything that went before. By John B. Taylor.

A Statistical Mirage

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Did stimulus spending really “create or save” more than 1 million jobs? By Edward P. Lazear.

Feeding a Sane and Lasting Recovery.

Feeding a Sane and Lasting Recovery

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Lead with a cut in the payroll tax, and millions of jobs will follow. By Michael J. Boskin.

By John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler.

Trouble, Doubled

by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Comprehensive, low-deductible, low-copayment insurance isn’t the solution—it’s the problem. By John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler.

The Bill for This Baby

by David Brady, Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Enthusiasm for universal coverage plummets when people find out how much they’d have to pay. By David W. Brady and Daniel P. Kessler.

Amend at Your Own Risk

by Thad Kousservia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Californians and New Yorkers, both clamoring for constitutional fixes, might want to take a lesson from each other’s mistakes. By Thad Kousser.

Bipartisan Tax Advice? You’ve Got It

by John F. Cogan, Christopher Edley Jr.via Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

California’s politicians are famously addicted to division and status quo. Can’t this time be different? By John F. Cogan and Christopher Edley Jr.

Lead On, California

by Michael J. Boskin, John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

How sweeping tax reforms could put the Golden State back on its feet. By Michael J. Boskin and John F. Cogan.

The Morning After

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Voters on the left coast have had their fling with the politics of hope and change—and ended up disappointed. As Arnold goes, so might go Barack. By Bill Whalen.

Visited by Furies

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Since 9/11, Americans have relaxed. The terrorists haven’t. By Fouad Ajami.

Why do the dictators rage? Because, thanks to oil, they can.

Energy Extortionists

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Why do the dictators rage? Because, thanks to oil, they can. By Victor Davis Hanson.

No Commitment to Victory

by Kori Schakevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

A “new” Afghanistan strategy with all the failings of the old. By Kori N. Schake.

Why Pakistan Must Succeed

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

The war in Afghanistan, a primitive land of 28 million, now threatens Pakistan, a nuclear-armed nation of 180 million. The collapse of Pakistan would place in danger a third nation: ours. By Thomas H. Henriksen.

Iran’s Most Wanted

by Christopher Hitchensvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

The new defense chief in Tehran is wanted by Interpol. He’s hardly the only criminal working there. By Christopher Hitchens.

Where the Autocrats Rule On

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Now that the U.S. freedom agenda has quietly been shelved, Arab lands can only reflect on what might have been. By Fouad Ajami.

Why the Peace Process Is Stalled

Why the Peace Process Is Stalled

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

The Obama administration is acting—publicly, at least—as if Israeli settlements were the only obstacle to Mideast peace. It will never be that simple. By Peter Berkowitz.

Tattered Road Map

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Even in a land divided so bitterly and so long, modest hopes persist. By Robert Zelnick.

Roosevelt

Hail on the Chief

by Lou Cannonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Crackpot! Socialist! Tyrant! Oh, how we Americans love to pillory our presidents. By Lou Cannon.

Dollars Adrift

Dollars Adrift

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Corporate taxes already drive U.S. companies offshore. The administration should think twice before making matters even worse. By Peter Robinson.

Goodbye to Norman Borlaug, who saved millions from starvation.

International Harvester

by Henry I. Millervia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Goodbye to Norman Borlaug, who saved millions from starvation. By Henry I. Miller.

Test Your Social Literacy

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

A decent education doesn’t merely confer good grades. It confers the ability to understand complex social issues—the health care battle, for instance. By Chester E. Finn Jr.

Refocusing Civil Rights Law

Refocusing Civil Rights Law

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Enforcement needs to keep moving forward, just as society does. “Disparate impact” lawsuits have outlived their usefulness. By Richard A. Epstein.

Utopia Is Overrated

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

In accepting something short of perfection, we learn to accept our freedom. By Thomas Sowell.

Start-Ups to the Rescue

by Jeffrey M. Jonesvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

No matter how dangerous the waters, entrepreneurs plunge in. How government can stay out of their way. By Jeffrey M. Jones.

Risks, Recessions, and Rewards

by Martin Wolfvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Markets may not be perfect, but do they still perform better than governments? And how. Martin Wolf interviews Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker.

cartoon of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Universal Questioner

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Hoover fellow Peter Berkowitz on Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, the late Soviet dissident and honorary Hoover fellow to whom “one word of truth outweighed the whole world.”

It’s Declinin’ Time Again

by Josef Joffevia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

The doomsayers are back. Regardless of what they say, the United States remains first on any scale of power that matters—economic, military, diplomatic, or cultural. By Josef Joffe.

Menachem Begin pictured in his secret-police mug shot

Agents of History

by Maciej Siekierski, Richard Sousavia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Secret police keep wonderful records. Researchers who study Lithuania can thank the KGB—and some hardworking archivists—for a priceless historical collection. By Maciej Siekierski and Richard Sousa.

Microfilmed images from a KGB dossier show, left to right, Akop Stepanian, Stepan Zatikian, and Zaven Bagdasarian.

Secret Justice Is No Justice

by Mark Harrisonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 14, 2010

Moscow hunted, caught, and punished three terrorists in the late 1970s. Or did it? KGB documents show how a climate of secrecy may leave the case forever in doubt. By Mark Harrison.