Wednesday, January 12, 2011

2011 No. 1

Fiscal Sanity illustration

An End to the Quick Fixes

by George P. Shultz, Michael J. Boskin, John F. Cogan, Allan H. Meltzer, John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Our return to prosperity depends on permanent tax cuts, predictable policies, and sane deficits. By George P. Shultz, Michael J. Boskin, John F. Cogan, Allan Meltzer, and John B. Taylor.

How to Grow out of the Deficit

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

The pressure for big tax increases vanishes when profligate spending does, too. By Edward P. Lazear.

Double Dips...or More

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Economic recovery often means multiple ups and downs. Harmful short-term policies only make the ride worse. By Michael J. Boskin.

Cash for Clunkers and Other Lemons

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Park those underperforming schemes; instead, put more cash in taxpayers’ pockets. By Robert J. Barro.

Margaret Thatcher and David Cameron

Amnesia à la Keynes

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Heaping up massive peacetime deficits has never helped rebuild an economy, and it won’t now. By Niall Ferguson.

Carter, Obama, and Clinton cartoon

The Unbearable Heaviness of Governing

by Morton Kellervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

At midterm, the Obama age has become something no one expected: an ordinary presidency. By Morton Keller.

Obamacare

Poison Pill

by Scott W. Atlasvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Letting the government play doctor is bad medicine. By Scott W. Atlas.

Uncle Sam

Days of Reckoning

by Charles Blahousvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Social Security is sinking while its would-be rescuers squabble over how to save it. Time to make common cause. By Charles Blahous.

Haitian kindergartners

Finding Optimism Again

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Our characteristic hope for the future has been shaken. Growth in per capita income can revive it. By Gary S. Becker.

A Medicine for Our Melancholy

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

A clue to that American “malaise”: even people comfortable with government turn queasy when it gets too big. By Richard A. Epstein.

Buck Island Reef Tours

Glimpses of Economic Liberty

by Clint Bolickvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Bit by bit, courts are being forced to ponder the laws and licenses that stifle people’s freedom to work. By Clint Bolick.

Education Reform Superman

The “War on Teachers” Is a Myth

by Eric Hanushekvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Unions that defend the worst teachers are depriving children of the best teaching. By Eric A. Hanushek.

Gitmo

Gitmo Breakout

by Jack Goldsmithvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

There is no quick way to dispel the legal murk surrounding terror detainees. But these five ideas could let in some light. By Jack Goldsmith.

French soldiers

Our Double-Edged Sword

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

The military’s “indirect approach”—battlefield restraint, cultural savvy, the use of local troops—means a big shift in the way U.S. forces operate. It demands a close look. By Thomas H. Henriksen.

Man with literature

Seeing Islamism Clearly

by Daniel Pipesvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Americans are starting to grasp what radicalism means—and to understand that moderate Islam is not the enemy. By Daniel Pipes.

The Wages of Militancy

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

The planners of the “ground zero mosque” chose confrontation. They should have chosen discretion. By Fouad Ajami.

Great Game without End

by Josef Joffevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Nobody wins in Afghanistan—at least not soon. Western democracies need to stay nimble, reserve the power to strike, and remain patient. By Josef Joffe.

Unfinished Business

by Kori Schakevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

How America should carry out its new post-combat role. By Kori N. Schake.

Shalom?

Is a Deal within Reach?

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

When it comes to Mideast peace talks, this time the optimists may have a case. By Robert Zelnick.

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and Vladimir Putin

Thirty Years of Cold Peace

by Fouad Ajamivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Hosni Mubarak has foiled the militants, kept the Pax Americana, and above all retained his grip on power. No one seems to be celebrating. By Fouad Ajami.

State Owned Enterprises cartoon

China Backpedals

by Jialin Zhangvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

State-owned companies are cramping the private sector—and putting a nascent market economy in jeopardy. By Jialin Zhang.

America, Dismantled

by Thomas Sowell, David Hogbergvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell digs in his heels against American decline. By David Hogberg.

Peter Berkowitz’s Five Books

by Peter Berkowitz, Jonathan Rauchvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

His reading list focuses on how liberty is won, lost, and neglected. By Jonathan Rauch.

Economic Recovery cartoon

“We Can’t Afford to Stand Still”

by Michael Spence, Nathan Gardelsvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

In a world of emerging economies, says Hoover fellow Michael Spence, there is no going back to the old “normal.” By Nathan Gardels.

Decline Is a Choice. Let’s Reject It

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

America can decide to be itself again: free, fair, and thriving. By Victor Davis Hanson.

Stalin’s Genocides

by Cynthia Havenvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Yet another crime the Soviet dictator got away with: defining genocide to exclude what he did. Hoover fellow Norman M. Naimark tells how it happened. By Cynthia Haven.

Reagan meets Gorbachev

A Communist Rogues’ Gallery

by John J. Millervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

His new Dictionary of 20th-Century Communism is no closed book. Hoover fellow Robert Service says the movement that claimed tens of millions of victims has “a living legacy, alas.” By John J. Miller.

Eighty-one students arrive in New York in 1959

Men with a Mission

by Tom Shachtmanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

The Scheinman collection brings to life the story of how two friends, a white American and a black Kenyan, helped African democracy bloom. By Tom Shachtman.

On the Cover of  Hoover Digest 2011 No. 1

On the Cover

via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

The early communist era was not known for gentle imagery. Propaganda posters overflow with blood, violence, macabre caricatures, shaken fists, and revolutionary shouting.

A security officer confronts a Red Square protester

You Have Been Warned

by Mark Harrisonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

How subtle the techniques with which the KGB ensured compliance . . . and how unsurprising to see them revived in today’s Russia. By Mark Harrison.