The High Cost of Good Intentions

by Tunku Varadarajan interview with John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Must all government programs keep growing—and deepening the national debt? Hoover fellow John Cogan sees hope in the rare exceptions. 

Aye, Robot

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Yes, the robots are coming, but not for our jobs. Automation will bring new kinds of work, and new chances to create wealth. 

Let's End Tax Anarchy

by John H. Cochrane via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

The tax code doesn’t need revision. It needs revolution. 

The Reform Less Traveled

by Scott W. Atlasvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Want to broaden access to health care? Bring down costs—by turning patients into smart consumers. 

Single-payer Delusion Syndrome

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Zealots like Bernie Sanders suffer from an acute case of central planning. The only cure is deregulation.

Rx for Rose-colored Glasses

by Lanhee J. Chen, Micah Weinbergvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

“Medicare for all”? Please. Every country with a nationalized health care system, even those held up as models, struggles with serious tradeoffs.

Land of Many Uses?

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Public lands should be public—not private playgrounds. The administration’s scrutiny of national monuments could restore this principle. 

No More Hot Air

by David R. Henderson, John H. Cochrane via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

If the climate is changing, political rhetoric won't help. Hard economic data can.

A Clean Deal on DACA

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Here's a creative way to fix the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program: sign it into law.

Orders in the Court

by Sharon Driscoll interview with Michael McConnellvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Executive orders are part of every president’s legal toolbox. But DACA? That, says Hoover scholar Michael W. McConnell, was the wrong tool for the job.

Population Power

by Timothy Kanevia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018
Ever since America began, immigration has meant strength.

Immigration that Pays Off

by Michael S. Bernstamvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

A novel idea to make immigration policy both fair and market-driven: require entrants to post "integration bonds."

No Shortage of Quagmires

by Williamson Murrayvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Seizing the military initiative can lead to success, as history confirms, but only if the party that seizes the initiative is fully prepared to exploit it. Few are. 

From Sparta to Saddam

by Barry Strauss via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Nations that abandon diplomacy enter a realm of violence and confusion.

Lighting the Fuse

by Michael R. Auslinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

A nuclear North Korea creates pressure for a nuclear South Korea-and Japan.

What Beijing Doesn't Want

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

North Korea's nuclear threats are shaking up Asian security. That could put a welcome brake on China's ambitions.

The Russia Gambit

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Vladimir Putin also could help US interests in Korea, but only if we play our own cards right. 

A Grand Korea Bargain

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

The Koreas will not reunite, nor will the North disarm. We can still build something durable on that cracked foundation. 

Vietnam on Film: Doom and Despair

by Bing West via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Ken Burns's recent TV documentary paints the war as a lost cause-while offering the usual bright, shining half-truths.

A Tale of Sound and Fury—and Amnesia

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

In war, it’s said, the first casualty is the truth. In the Burns-Novick film about the Vietnam War, that truth was the Cold War.

Toward a Clean, Well-lighted Internet

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Social networks swerve in unexpected—and sometimes dark—directions, defying utopian attempts to harness them. Digital citizens need to master hyperconnection without being mastered. 

Once More unto the Breach

by Herbert Linvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Recent thefts of credit data show how little power consumers have over their own information. This has to change. 

Cyber Invaders

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

We still don’t know how deeply Russia interfered in US elections, but we do know how to make it harder for the Russians to interfere next time.

Keeping the Lights On

by Jeremy Carlvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Nuclear power has to remain part of our energy mix. 

Chain Reactions

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. , George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Before we jettison nuclear energy, let's count the costs: to the economy, to the environment, and to national security.

Power to the States

by David Davenport, Lenny Mendoncavia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Disarray in Washington has a silver lining: state and local governments reclaiming their essential role in American democracy. 

California Flunks History

by Williamson M. Eversvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

The Golden State's standards for teaching history are jury-rigged, unfactual, and biased. Oh, and they're likely to get worse.

I'm OK, You're Not Learning

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

The California-born self-esteem movement has morphed into “social-emotional learning.” But it still sidelines real academic skills. 

A Sick Hunger for Racism

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Why can’t leftists let go of the whole idea of all-powerful, permanent white bigotry? Because it empowers them

"I'm Not Running for Office"

by Chris Sweeney interview with Harvey C. Mansfieldvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Hoover fellow Harvey Mansfield, when not studying American political parties, relishes his role at Harvard: the politically incorrect Party of One. 

Dilbert and the Donald

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams on managing luck, parsing Trump, and otherwise cutting pointy-headed experts down to size. 

Statues of Limitation

by Markos Kounalakisvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

How do the countries of the former Iron Curtain deal with their inconvenient monuments? Sometimes by painting a tank pink, or swapping a Stalin for a Steve Jobs. 

The Crown under the Hammer

by Bertrand M. Patenaude, Jodi Robertsvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Pictures at a revolution.