The Careful Economy

by John H. Cochranevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

There is no magic bullet against the coronavirus. Instead, defeating it will take time, wisdom, and imagination.

Address the Supply Shock

by Kevin Warshvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

The Fed has done right by Wall Street. Now it’s Main Street’s turn.

Nimbler, Smaller Solutions

by Raghuram Rajanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Communities, not big government, should take the lead in repairing the damage from this crisis—and preparing for the next one.

Not in the Same Boat

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Who took the biggest hit from the pandemic? The young, the low earners, and the small businesses.

Advantage: Democracy

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Why free nations emerge from crises stronger than do repressive regimes.

Totalitarian Temptation

by Josef Joffevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Of all the falsehoods spawned by the world’s struggle, the most dangerous might be this: that China handled it best.

Fatally Vulnerable

by Michael R. Auslinvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

We should never have become so dependent on China’s favor and its factories in the first place.

Newsom the Rainmaker

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

California needs federal aid; Washington needs California to bounce back fast. That’s why President Trump and Governor Newsom are playing nice—at least for now.

Walled Cities on a Hill

by Henry A. Kissingervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Long after this crisis fades, free nations must continue healing the world economy, restraining power, and pursuing justice and security. The democratic future is at stake.

This Sudden Chill

by Michael R. Auslinvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Beijing’s global ambitions are only increasing, pandemic or not. So is the danger China poses to the United States and other free nations.

“Doomed to Cooperate”

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Just as during the Cold War, Beijing and Washington must work together against this common threat or fail separately.

How to Make China Pay

by John Yoo, Ivana Stradnervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Beijing hid the coronavirus outbreak, at the cost of broken economies and lost lives. International law offers one way to seek damages.

Serve the State

by Markos Kounalakisvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Censorship and propaganda are business as usual for Chinese “news agencies,” which in fact are spy agencies.

Illusions of Change

by Peter M. Robinson interview with Stephen Kotkinvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

China was supposed to have transformed itself into a modern, democratic state by now, but this was not to be. What went wrong—and what should the United States do now? A conversation with Hoover fellow Stephen Kotkin.

Another Political Placebo

by Scott W. Atlasvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Medicare for All was never going to be a miracle cure—far less in times of pandemic.

“Public Option” Dead End

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Joe Biden’s health plan would bring higher taxes for most Americans and turbulence to the insurance market.

Cheated by Collectivism

by George P. Shultz, Michael J. Boskin, John F. Cogan, John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Businesses do good by benefiting their shareholders, not pursuing a phantom of “social responsibility.”

The World as It Is

by Stephen D. Krasnervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

The United States can neither fix the world’s governance problems nor ignore them. The middle way: helping others rule well.

An Incorrigible State

by Tony Badranvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Washington should stop looking for that elusive moderation in Iran. The state itself is the problem.

Shaken, not Deterred

by Sanam Vakilvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Despite sanctions, protests, and the toll of disease, Iran is likely to continue along its destructive regional path.

What About Next Year?

by Michael J. Petrillivia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

There’s a strong case for having many students, especially those from poor families, repeat the school year the pandemic has cost them. If done well, this could be a gift of extra time.

Cuba’s Dubious Miracle

by Paul E. Petersonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Havana has always boasted of its schools, which some educators even tout as a model for the United States. But in communist Cuba, education is never what it seems. The supposed excellence of those schools is highly suspect.

Contempt in Court

by David Davenportvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

How anti-American ideologues hijacked the International Criminal Court.

Bureaucrats and Indians

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

American Indian tribes are quite competent to manage the federal lands they know so well, and Washington should let them do so.

Gig Workers to the Rescue

by Lee Ohanianvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Maybe it took an emergency to prove the worth of flexible, on-demand workers. Now will Sacramento finally ease its stranglehold over the gig economy?

Ruins of the Great Society

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Lyndon Johnson’s grand program was born under a fatal paradox, says historian Amity Shlaes: the beliefs that “we can do anything” but “only the government can do it.” That tangled ambition led not to greatness but to a great disappointment.

The “Jewell” of Carmel

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

No longer Dirty Harry, Clint Eastwood still emits the occasional “Make my day!” But the Hollywood provocateur, director/producer of the recent Richard Jewell, also admits he wishes the president were less “ornery.”

Tomorrow’s Child

by William Damonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Students need purpose. And there’s never been a better time to teach them that purpose derives from love of family, neighbors, and country.

Pale Horse

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

The coronavirus proves once again the power of epidemics to upend, and sometimes erase, civilizations. Relearning a lesson the ancient world understood only too well.

Western Civ and Its Discontents

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Defending the history of liberal democracy is no mere intellectual exercise—it’s crucial to preserving our rights and liberties.

Rescuers in Another Time

by Mary Schaeffer Conroy, Valentina Fedorovna Sosonkinavia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

A hundred years ago, American doctors came to the aid of Belarus, a struggling Soviet republic where displaced people were falling prey to disease. In an eerily familiar story, overwhelmed hospitals and shortages of medical supplies prolonged the suffering. So did revolution and war.

On the Cover

via Hoover Digest
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

This poster from World War II Britain is a reminder of another era in which public health took on broad importance, with implications that crossed borders and even touched on world politics and conflict. Here are two science students examining samples under a microscope. What may be remarkable to modern viewers of this poster from the Hoover Archives is that the young scientists are not researching a vaccine or a cure. 

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