What Did Afghanistan Mean?

by Peter M. Robinson interview with H. R. McMaster, Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Hoover fellows H. R. McMaster and Victor Davis Hanson scrutinize the long and ultimately futile American campaign to remake Afghanistan.

“Power and Principle”: A Coda

by Peter M. Robinson interview with Condoleezza Rice, General Jim Mattis, John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Condoleezza Rice, Jim Mattis, John B. Taylor, and Karen Hughes reflect on 9/11 and twenty tumultuous years.

Losing Our Way

by John Yoo, Robert J. Delahuntyvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

US goals in Afghanistan changed gradually—and fatally. As nation-building efforts increased, victory slipped away.

Jihadi vs. Jihadi

by Cole Bunzelvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

And now, the power struggle.

No Country for Young Women

by Ayaan Hirsi Alivia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

For the legions of hopeful women who pursued careers and degrees, who now live longer lives and dream of a wider world, Afghanistan has become terra incognita. Many will not submit.

Crossing to Safety

via Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

The Hoover Institution is leading a broad, international effort to help Afghan allies escape Taliban rule and find new homes.

By Jonathan Movroydis

What About Africa?

by Russell A. Bermanvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

The Afghanistan pullout doesn’t mean the United States can now ignore other regions, especially Africa. If anything, US attention to the Sahel should intensify.

Pillars of Wisdom

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Five points Americans should absorb from decades of unusually bitter politics.

A Convenient Untruth

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Why does China’s COVID-19 slander against the United States sound familiar? Because bogus tales of American “biowarfare” surfaced before, during the Korean War, and they lingered for decades.

Tomorrow’s Arms Race

by Rose Gottemoellervia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

The fundamental contest between Beijing and its nuclear rivals is not just about ships, missiles, and warheads but about technology itself.

Where Is the Inequality?

by Cale Clingenpeel , Tyler Goodspeedvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

“Surging inequality” is the phantom that just won’t go away—despite rising household wealth in the Trump years, even during the pandemic.

Of Course, Incentives Matter

by Kevin Hassettvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Playing politics, certain economists have engaged in a bizarre rejection of incentives, one of the most basic tools of economics.

The Losses of Lockdown

by Peter M. Robinson interview with Tyler Goodspeedvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

New Hoover fellow Tyler Goodspeed, a former White House economic adviser, on the Trump economy before COVID—and why it proved a boon for the American taxpayer, worker, and investor.

Counting Climate Costs

by John H. Cochranevia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Climate change is always and everywhere an economic question.

A Simple Fix

by Daniel P. Kesslervia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

High-priced employer-provided health plans inflate costs and divert a vast amount of potential tax revenue. We should tax them.

A Golden Age of Federalism

by Clint Bolickvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Amid turbulent times and partisan rancor, state governments—our “laboratories of democracy”—are busier than ever.

Daring to Undeceive

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

The end of the British empire represents only too telling a parallel for post-Afghanistan America.

Red Lines for Russia

by Jack Goldsmithvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Even after years of cyberwar, the United States still responds to Russian attacks with bluster. How to replace empty threats with rules we intend to enforce.

The Best Defense . . .

by John Yoo, Ivana Stradnervia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

State-sponsored cybercrime costs billions and endangers national security. When will President Biden finally do something about it?

Threats Never Sleep

by Amy Zegartvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

We still haven’t done enough to prevent another 9/11.

Ally in Waiting . . . Still Waiting

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Ukraine keeps Russia at bay while the White House keeps Ukraine at arm’s length. Kiev deserves better.

Escape the Culture Wars

by Michael J. Petrillivia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Let the school boards and the politicians rage. Parents and teachers can reach common ground on what really matters: helping kids.

A Nation Still at Risk

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

In American schools, the “rising tide of mediocrity” keeps rising.

Texas or Bust

by Lee Ohanian, Joseph Vranichvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Even tech giants are among the many businesses fleeing California for a better, more affordable life.

Newsom’s New Year

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

After his triumph in last fall’s recall election, California’s governor is again confidently woke.

“This Is a Sputnik Moment”

by Peter M. Robinson interview with Amy Zegartvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Hoover fellow Amy B. Zegart has built her career analyzing the big threats. Today’s biggest, she says, is China.

How Do We Know?

by Russ Robertsvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Jonathan Rauch, author of The Constitution of Knowledge, traces the convoluted road to facts that humans must follow through error, raw information, and opinion. The online world only adds new twists.

To Be Jewish in America

by Josef Joffevia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Anti-Semitism in the United States may appear to be on the rise, but the centuries during which Jews found increasing acceptance suggest that their place in American life remains secure.

Looking Back without Anger

by William Damonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Everyone can benefit from a “life review”—not a doleful look at the past but a quest for closure and acceptance.

Fanfare for the “Uncommon” Man

featuring Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Celebrating a quarter-century of Hoover’s long-running video series, Uncommon Knowledge with Peter Robinson.

By Guy Denton

A Bumpy Road to the Free Market

by Hsiao-ting Linvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

Chiang Ching-kuo is often remembered, approvingly, for steering Taiwan toward a high-tech future. But his diaries also show how his stubborn faith in central planning held Taiwan back from prosperity.

On the Cover

via Hoover Digest
Monday, January 31, 2022

A tranquil travel poster beckons: “Come to Ulster.” The Ulster Tourist Development Association (UTDA), which printed the poster, was established in 1923 to work with railroads, seaside resorts, towns, and businesses in Northern Ireland. 

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