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How Policy Became War

by David Davenport, Gordon Lloydvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Wars on poverty, on drugs, on terrorism: for decades the federal government has been declaring war—metaphorical, that is. The casualties? Compromise, reason, and the separation of powers.

Is the Recovery Ending?

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Slower job creation doesn’t mean a recession is imminent. But policy makers can’t assume growth will take care of itself.

Universal Income: How to Bust the Bank

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

This utopian scheme would create the mother of all welfare states.

Brave New Automated World

by Michael Spencevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

The digital revolution holds great promise for human well-being—if that revolution can be managed.

“Free” Health Care Isn’t

by Scott W. Atlasvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

How single-payer systems fail their patients.

Scrub This Fantasy

by Charles Blahousvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

“Medicare for all” is a prescription for fresh inefficiencies and stratospheric costs. We couldn’t afford it—and we shouldn’t even want it.

How to Save Democracy

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

A surge of authoritarianism has overwhelmed the “freedom agenda.” Yet even as Russia rages and China seethes, America can, and must, stand up for democracy.

Indispensable Free Speech

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Free speech defends our other freedoms and offends would-be autocrats. It’s time to revive this bedrock American principle.

Laugh On

by Bruce Thorntonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Free people know how—and why—to cut elites down to size.

Clarence Thomas Holds the Line

by Adam J. Whitevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

To the chagrin of populists and progressives alike, the Supreme Court justice displays an intelligent and insistent fidelity to the Constitution.

Integration Is No Panacea

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Sixty-five years after the Supreme Court rejected “separate but equal” classrooms, segregation—formal segregation, at least—is gone. Yet our schools still struggle. Reform now depends more on excellence than on inclusion.

Better Students and Better Jobs

by Amber M. Northern, Michael J. Petrillivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

A new survey shows that the jobs for which students are training simply aren’t the jobs employers want to fill. How to fix this mismatch.

Polluters and Scapegoats

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Banning plastic bags won’t save the planet. Real progress will have to extend well beyond empty gestures.

Continental Drift

by Josef Joffevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Across Europe, political disruptors are elbowing aside the established parties. The disruptors’ goals, when they can be discerned, are all over the map.

Tiananmen Dreams

by Amy Zegartvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Throughout modern history, China has defied the experts and their expectations. Now, as always, the Middle Kingdom will move at its own pace.

Dire Strait

by Michael R. Auslinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Taiwan must decide how to respond to military provocations from the mainland. America may have to decide, too.

Islands in the Stream

by Eric Wakin, Hsiao-ting Linvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

A handful of small islands once formed a battleground in the Taiwan-China clash. Today those islands not only are at peace but represent a bridge of sorts between the two old adversaries.

Putting Tolerance to the Test

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

At its founding, India displayed a powerful affinity for Western values—equality, self-rule, dignity. But in the name of Hindu tradition, the country’s present rulers are flouting those values.

Building Democracy on Sand

by Arye Carmonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Israel lacks a constitution—and any clear idea of where it is going. A new book takes up the unanswered questions of the Jewish state.

Clausewitz Goes East

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

In the Mideast, it’s the power centers that matter—not territory, not capitals, but far-flung and complex alliances.

Hopeless in Gaza

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Palestinians, in refusing even to consider taking economic aid in exchange for reforms, are only harming themselves.

Elegy in an English Church

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

One quietly proud corner of Britain sees Brexit as a matter of what to keep, not whom to exclude.

Untangling Homelessness

by Lee Ohanianvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Throwing money at the problem while blocking development just worsens housing problems. What would help? Unleashing homebuilders and job-creating businesses, especially in the Central Valley and the hinterlands

Tax Avengers: Endgame?

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

A recent schools tax measure failed—and failed badly. Californians may not be all that eager to weaken Proposition 13 after all.

“None of the Wars Has Been Won”

by Peter M. Robinson interview with David Davenportvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Hoover fellow David Davenport, co-author of How Public Policy Became War, calls for a rhetorical cease-fire.

A Bridge over a Troubled Century

featuring Norman M. Naimarkvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Celebrating Hoover fellow Norman M. Naimark.

Trafficking in Thoughtcrime

by Harvey C. Mansfieldvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

How a distinguished thinker learned of his disinvitation.

Reparations Are for the Living

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Trying to repay people for the losses their ancestors suffered would never work. Worse, it would never achieve justice.

I Unlearned Hate

by Ayaan Hirsi Alivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Born into a culture that blamed Jews for all wrongdoing, a scholar explains how she broke free of that prejudice—and how a certain Somali-American congresswoman can, too.

Red Again

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Who would have expected both a new Cold War and a fresh fascination with socialism?

Stanford and the Great War

by Jean McElwee Cannonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Collections in the Hoover Archives tell the stories of the Stanford students who were eager to go “over there,” driving battlefield ambulances and flying over the front lines.

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Chain Reactions

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr., George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Before we jettison nuclear energy, let's count the costs: to the economy, to the environment, and to national security.

Keeping the Lights On

by Jeremy Carlvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Nuclear power has to remain part of our energy mix. 

Cyber Invaders

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

We still don’t know how deeply Russia interfered in US elections, but we do know how to make it harder for the Russians to interfere next time.

Once More unto the Breach

by Herbert Linvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Recent thefts of credit data show how little power consumers have over their own information. This has to change. 

Toward a Clean, Well-lighted Internet

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Social networks swerve in unexpected—and sometimes dark—directions, defying utopian attempts to harness them. Digital citizens need to master hyperconnection without being mastered. 

Vietnam on Film: Doom and Despair

by Bing Westvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Ken Burns's recent TV documentary paints the war as a lost cause-while offering the usual bright, shining half-truths.

A Grand Korea Bargain

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

The Koreas will not reunite, nor will the North disarm. We can still build something durable on that cracked foundation. 

The Russia Gambit

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Vladimir Putin also could help US interests in Korea, but only if we play our own cards right. 

A Voice from the Camps

by Emily Johnsonvia Hoover Digest
Monday, October 23, 2017

A literary quest brings life to the story of Latvian journalist Arsenii Formakov, an imprisoned poet who yearned for Motherland and freedom. 

Free Speech Doesn’t Need “Rethinking”

by Tunku Varadarajan featuring Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Monday, October 23, 2017

Persuasion is American, coercion is not. To Hoover scholar Richard Epstein, the First Amendment is both bedrock and shield. 

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The Hoover Digest is a quarterly publication that offers informative writing on politics, economics, and history by the scholars and researchers of the Institution. The Digest elegantly portrays the breadth, depth, and reach of Hoover’s scholarship, and in addition, highlights several compelling stories from our archives.  It can be accessed online here, but is also available in print. 

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The opinions expressed in the Hoover Digest are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.