Military History in the News

Explore Research

Filter By:

Topic

Author

Enter comma-separated IDs of authors
Enter comma-separated IDs of contributors

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

“Hail Caesar!” Again and Again

by Ralph Petersvia Military History in the News
Friday, April 19, 2019

By his own account, Julius Caesar was a brilliant soldier, and his masterful prose obscures his later misrule. Brutus didn’t draw his dagger because he was having a bad-toga day. In his time, Caesar set the pattern for repeated—all but countless—military moves against the Roman state and, consequently, rule by ill-suited emperors, with here and there a blood-sustained triumvirate or a doomed duopoly inserted between one-man reigns. The Roman Empire was not destroyed by barbarians, but by soldiers determined to fix it.

New War for an Ancient Prize

by Ralph Petersvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, April 9, 2019

As the forces of Libyan warlord, self-promoted General Khalifa Haftar, sweep out of Cyrenaica to close on Tripoli, the weaponry has changed but the patterns of military movement remain roughly the same as they have for four millennia.

U.S. Armed Forces On The Border With Mexico? We Never Left.

by Ralph Petersvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Amid threats to close the southern border of the United States, a benign U.S. military deployment along our frontier with Mexico remains a charged political issue. Yet, not only do the U.S. Armed Forces have a long history of serving on that border, they, in fact, never left it. Active U.S. Army installations, such as Fort Bliss near El Paso or Fort Huachuca in southern Arizona, serve as thriving testaments to an armed presence more than 170 years old: There is little new along the Rio Grande or under the Sonoran sun.

Political Correctness And History: In Defense Of Churchill

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Thursday, February 28, 2019

In October of this past year, the astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted a famous quote from Winston Churchill: “in victory, magnanimity.” For his troubles he received a host of outraged tweets from the politically correct crowd that Churchill was a racist, responsible for the 1943 famine in Bengal, and numerous other supposed atrocities as Britain’s leader during the Second World War. The tweets are a remarkable tribute to the widespread ignorance of the past among those who so delightedly cast their fury at the past.

Preparing For The Future

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, February 26, 2019

The use of history to think about the present and the future is always difficult for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most important difficulty is that to use it successfully one has to have read deeply and widely in it, and even then, its potential lessons are ambiguous and uncertain. 

On Grand Strategy And China

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, February 22, 2019

Whether one talks about grand strategy or military strategy, one must recognize both the crucial importance of means–end analysis, and also of geography. Not surprisingly, given the contempt the German military displayed towards strategic thinking in the two world wars they fought and lost, the Reich’s naval leaders and the Kaiser ignored those two crucial elements in developing the High Seas Fleet in the period before the Second World War.

On Grand Strategy And Russia

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Vladimir Putin has proven himself a masterful tactician, who, as all tacticians do, maneuvers in the present with little regard for the future. He has managed to attack Georgia for its arrogance in daring to consider joining NATO, seize the Crimea, cause a nasty struggle in eastern Ukraine, and while destabilizing that state, launch a massive cyberattack on Estonia, assassinate various Russian defectors in the United Kingdom through the use of radioactive materials, and interfere in the 2016 elections in the United States along with other crimes and misdemeanors inflicted on his own people.

Scrap Medal

by Andrew Robertsvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Readers of The Times (of London) this month were surprised to read the headline “The British Heroes Honoured by Adolf Hitler.” Was some terrible, nationally-humiliating scandal breaking about Britons who were secretly working for the Nazis during World War Two? In fact. it was an interesting military history story that casts light on an often forgotten aspect of the Spanish Civil War: the naval side.

A Philatelic Flaw

by Andrew Robertsvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 22, 2019

The Royal Mail in Britain is often held up as an example of meticulous accuracy and research, but not this month when it got its military history so disastrously wrong as to announce a new stamp purportedly showing Allied soldiers wading ashore in Normandy on D-Day when in fact the photo depicted an unopposed landing in Dutch New Guinea.

A New Sacred Use For An Old Trophy Of War

by Andrew Robertsvia Military History in the News
Monday, January 14, 2019

Military History is rarely out of the news in Russia, and this month it was announced that a new Army Cathedral there will have its front steps made out of melted-down tanks seized from the Germans in the Great Patriotic War of 1941–45. President Vladimir Putin, whose pet project this is, has raised 1.8 billion roubles (£20.9 million, $26.8 million) for a three hundred-foot high brand-new Main Cathedral of the Armed Forces in Patriot Park, a military theme park 40 miles from Moscow.

Pages

Wars, terrorism, and revolution are the daily fare of our globalized world, interconnected by instantaneous electronic news.

Military History in the News is a weekly column from the Hoover Institution that reflects on how the study of the past alone allows us to make sense of the often baffling daily violence, not by offering exact parallels from history, but rather by providing contexts of similarity and difference that foster perspective and insight—and reassurance that nothing is ever quite new.