Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Issue 22

How will new gas and oil production affect, if at all, America’s military and geostrategic role abroad?
Background Essay
Background Essay

The Strategic Consequences Of Increased U.S. Energy Production

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Over the past decade, we have seen an astonishing recovery of America’s position as a major producer of fossil fuels. In the case of natural gas, the reserves in North America appear extensive enough to sustain most of the energy demands of the American, Canadian, and Mexican economies and still export substantial amounts of that crucial energy well into the next century.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

America Strikes Oil, Literally And Figuratively

by Kori Schakevia Strategika
Thursday, March 26, 2015

J. Paul Getty advised young people to rise early, work hard, and strike oil. It was the recipe to success for many an American robber baron of the nineteenth century, a fortune in both senses of the word being made all over again as hydraulic fracturing enables American energy production to burgeon. American energy production is advancing our national security, as well, emboldening our friends and impinging on our enemies

Featured Commentary

A More Powerful United States

by Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Thursday, March 26, 2015

The revolution in U.S. energy production is one of the big stories of our time, and it has consequences for the future of America’s primary geostrategic project of generating, leading, and defending a liberal capitalist world order. Not every result of American energy production will be positive, but the net effect will be to support America’s ability to play a leading role in world affairs.