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Thursday, October 22, 2020

Issue 68

Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean
Background Essay
Background Essay

Turkey In The Eastern Mediterranean Crisis

by Soner Cagaptayvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Three wars that Turkey is currently involved in, namely in Syria, Libya, and the South Caucasus, suggest that Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s foreign policy has settled into a new phase. Erdoğan is building a “mini Empire” by—often—simultaneously fighting and power- brokering with his Russian homologue, and to this end the Eastern Mediterranean provides ample opportunities for him.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

It’s Not The Energy, Stupid!

by Zafiris Rossidisvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

In 2020, with the strong presence of American, Russian, French, Greek, Turkish, Egyptian, Italian, and even German warships, the Eastern Mediterranean has become one of the most militarized seas in the world.

Featured Commentary

Crisis In The Eastern Mediterranean

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

The Eastern Mediterranean, like the Middle East, is a tough neighborhood. The current standoff over natural gas rights among Greece, Turkey, and their respective allies is only the latest example.

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Related Commentary

Western Military Aid for Ukraine

by Frederick W. Kaganvia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Vladimir Putin’s neo-imperialism has already brought inter-state warfare back to Europe for the first time since World War II. Its likely continuation threatens the existence of Ukraine, but is also the first traditional military test of the NATO alliance in Europe since the end of the Cold War. Western responses to Russia’s unprovoked and illegal aggressions in Georgia and Ukraine have been inadequate.

Related Commentary

Countering Russian Ambitions

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Any thought of countering Russian ambitions in Europe must be premised on the fact that Western Europeans’ interest in doing this is verbal at best. Absent Western Europe’s active cooperation, U.S. attempts to strengthen the front line states of the former Warsaw Pact and of the former Soviet Union would face formidable hurdles and perhaps invite Russia to test our seriousness.

Related Commentary

Inaction in Ukraine Sets a Dangerous Precedent

by Max Bootvia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

The U.S. and Europe have been slow and hesitant in countering Vladimir Putin’s outrageous land grab in Ukraine. If allowed to stand, Russia’s annexation of Crimea and its ability to wrest the eastern part of the country from Kiev’s control will set a dangerous precedent that will encourage aggression by China and other states. A more serious counter to Russia’s actions is necessary.

Featured Commentary

We Can End Russia’s War Against Ukraine

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

To stay in power with declining living standards, Vladimir Putin must invent a foreign enemy (the United States), which has overthrown the legitimate government of Ukraine, props up a puppet government with a “foreign legion,” and plans a sneak attack on Russia. In Putin’s “alternative world” narrative, Russia’s actions in Eastern Ukraine are purely defensive and humanitarian. His requirement for “peace” is veto power over Ukrainian policy for his puppet “people’s republic” of Eastern Ukraine, e.g. the de facto end of an independent Ukraine.

Featured Commentary

To Restrain Russia, Drop The Ambiguity

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Lack of means is no part of the reason why U.S. policy is failing to restrain Russia. Rather, that reason lies in the U.S. government’s simultaneous pursuit of self-contradictory objectives, what Henry Kissinger extolled as “creative ambiguity.” This has opened a fateful gap between words and deeds. Clear, univocal policy that unites words and deeds, ends and means, has ever been the prerequisite of seriousness.

Related Commentary

American Leadership, Commitment, and Perseverance in the Middle East

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Tuesday, February 17, 2015

U.S. disengagement from Middle Eastern affairs, highlighted by the Obama administration’s withdrawal of American forces from Iraq, its failure to lead an international stability force in Libya after the overthrow of the Qaddafi regime, and its unwillingness to enforce self-proclaimed red lines in Syria, has reduced U.S. influence in the region to an all-time low.

Strategika–“Understanding the Threat from Radical Islam” with Joshua Muravchik

with Joshua Muravchik via Strategika
Friday, January 9, 2015

Why combating terrorism requires moral clarity.

Strategika–“Undermining the Islamist Ideology” with Col. Joseph Felter

interview with Joseph Felter via Strategika
Friday, January 9, 2015

How the West can combat the root causes of terrorism.

Related Commentary

Boots Necessary to Reboot Our Influence

by Bing Westvia Strategika
Friday, December 19, 2014

America has only one commander-in-chief at a time.

Related Commentary

Rebooting the U.S.’s Middle East Policy

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Friday, December 19, 2014

To reboot its policy in the Middle East, the United States need not follow any sophisticated programs or up-to-date ideas. It needs only to act according to a rule as old as the Greeks and Romans: help your friends and hurt your enemies.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

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