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Thursday, October 22, 2020

Issue 68

Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean
Background Essay
Background Essay

Turkey In The Eastern Mediterranean Crisis

by Soner Cagaptayvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Three wars that Turkey is currently involved in, namely in Syria, Libya, and the South Caucasus, suggest that Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s foreign policy has settled into a new phase. Erdoğan is building a “mini Empire” by—often—simultaneously fighting and power- brokering with his Russian homologue, and to this end the Eastern Mediterranean provides ample opportunities for him.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

It’s Not The Energy, Stupid!

by Zafiris Rossidisvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

In 2020, with the strong presence of American, Russian, French, Greek, Turkish, Egyptian, Italian, and even German warships, the Eastern Mediterranean has become one of the most militarized seas in the world.

Featured Commentary

Crisis In The Eastern Mediterranean

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

The Eastern Mediterranean, like the Middle East, is a tough neighborhood. The current standoff over natural gas rights among Greece, Turkey, and their respective allies is only the latest example.

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Related Commentary

Point the Way Out of the Hole

by Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Friday, December 19, 2014

The first step for the United States in the Middle East is to observe the First Rule of Holes: stop digging. The pursuit of a nuclear understanding with Iran without simultaneously acting to constrain Iran’s effort to dominate the region has destabilized the Sunni world, undermined key American alliances, and contributed to the rise of ISIS and related groups.

Related Commentary

Five Points for Success in the Middle East

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Friday, December 19, 2014

To reestablish a favorable balance of power across the Greater Middle East—the region stretching from the northwest coast of Africa through the Arab lands of the Levant and Persian Gulf into South Asia—the United States must first be clear about its geopolitical goals.

Featured Commentary

Know the Enemy and the Nature of the Conflict We Face

by Joseph Felter via Strategika
Friday, December 19, 2014

An important first step in rebooting U.S. Middle East policy and more effectively addressing the roots of the problems that have manifested into threats to U.S. and international security demands that we more holistically embrace Sun Tzu’s maxim of the importance of knowing one’s enemy.

Featured Commentary

The U.S. Must Turn Over Its Upside-Down Foreign Policy

by Kimberly Kaganvia Strategika
Friday, December 19, 2014

The United States does not have an image problem in the Middle East. It has a reality problem. The United States has lost credibility in the Middle East by abandoning its friends and reaching out to its enemies.

Background Essay

Time to Combat the Spreading Virus of Radical Islam

by Joshua Muravchik via Strategika
Friday, December 19, 2014

America’s clout in the Middle East is waning, but this is not the fruit of an inexorable process divorced from human will. Rather it reflects aggressive bids by other actors—Iran, Russia, Turkey, and a variety of Islamist factions—to enhance their power at the same time that America has pursued a policy of lowering its profile and shrinking its footprint.

Strategika – “China and Japan: A Tense Equilibrium” with Mark Moyar

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Why Chinese-Japanese tensions are unlikely to dissipate soon—and why that may prove dangerous.

Strategika – “What China Really Wants” with Angelo Codevilla

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Explaining the nature of Chinese ambition in East Asia.

Strategika – “Chinese-Japanese Tensions” with Miles Maochun Yu

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Exploring a history of animosity between two Asian giants.

Featured Commentary

Japan’s Pivotal Position

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

If underlying geopolitical factors are the overriding cause of the recent decline in relations between China and Japan, then the current trajectory is likely to persist, for there is little reason to believe that those factors will change.

Featured Commentary

The Main Obstacle

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Monday, November 10, 2014

As in previous millennia of history, China’s objective for its periphery—the East Asia/Western Pacific region—is subordination of some kind or degree. Japan, being the only indigenous major power in the region, and allied formally with the United States (Russia having ceased to be an Asian power), is the main obstacle to that desired suzerainty.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

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