Strategika

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Thursday, October 22, 2020

Issue 68

Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean
Background Essay
Background Essay

Turkey In The Eastern Mediterranean Crisis

by Soner Cagaptayvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Three wars that Turkey is currently involved in, namely in Syria, Libya, and the South Caucasus, suggest that Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s foreign policy has settled into a new phase. Erdoğan is building a “mini Empire” by—often—simultaneously fighting and power- brokering with his Russian homologue, and to this end the Eastern Mediterranean provides ample opportunities for him.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

It’s Not The Energy, Stupid!

by Zafiris Rossidisvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

In 2020, with the strong presence of American, Russian, French, Greek, Turkish, Egyptian, Italian, and even German warships, the Eastern Mediterranean has become one of the most militarized seas in the world.

Featured Commentary

Crisis In The Eastern Mediterranean

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

The Eastern Mediterranean, like the Middle East, is a tough neighborhood. The current standoff over natural gas rights among Greece, Turkey, and their respective allies is only the latest example.

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Poster Collection, CC 75, Hoover Institution Archives.

Strategika: “The Implications of Chinese History” with Edward Luttwak

by Edward N. Luttwak via Strategika
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Edward Luttwak explains how Chinese history should color our perceptions of that nation’s modern ambitions.

Hoover Archives poster collection: CC 89

Strategika: “Can America Manage China’s Rise?” with Gary Roughead

by Admiral Gary Rougheadvia Strategika
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Retired Admiral Gary Roughead looks at America’s options to keep the rise of China from causing global instability.

Hoover Archives poster collection: CC 94

Strategika “Can China Be a Cooperative Power?” with Ian Morris

via Strategika
Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Ian Morris looks at which variables may determine whether China is aggressive or peaceful in the future.

Poster Collection, US 2706, Hoover Institution Archives.
Related Commentary

Provocation in a Time of Uncertainty

by Colonel Eric Shirleyvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, April 8, 2014

As was widely anticipated, the 2015 defense budget proposal follows the narrative of the postwar drawdown of the U.S. Army. As Secretary of Defense Hagel rightly states, “The world is growing more volatile, more unpredictable, and in some instances more threatening to the United States.” 

Related Commentary

Israel's Worst Enemy

by Bruce Thorntonvia Front Page Magazine Online
Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The Washington Post reports that some members of Secretary of State John Kerry’s senior staff think it’s time to say “enough” of Kerry’s futile and delusional attempts to broker peace between the Israelis and Arabs and implement the “two-state solution.” That’s a revelation one would think the chief diplomat of the greatest power in history would have experienced decades ago.

Related Commentary

Credible Leadership Should Seek More Than Containment

by Kiron K. Skinnervia Strategika
Tuesday, April 1, 2014

U.S. Cold War presidential directives coalesced around precepts that defense experts and foreign policy elites advocated: Mutual Assured Destruction (having enough nuclear retaliatory power so that the adversary would not risk a first strike); containing Soviet expansionism, especially in key industrial centers; nuclear arms control negotiations at all costs; the policy of linkage—tying U.S.-Soviet negotiations on one front to bilateral progress on other fronts; and preemptive concession making to demonstrate goodwill toward the Soviet Union.

Poster Collection, RU/SU 1437, Hoover Institution Archives.
Featured Commentary

Vladimir Putin, Murderer of Myths

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Related Commentary

Russia: Weaker than What?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Strategika
Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Related Commentary

Putin Pushed Against An Open Door

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Tuesday, April 1, 2014

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.