Strategika

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Thursday, October 22, 2020

Issue 68

Crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean
Background Essay
Background Essay

Turkey In The Eastern Mediterranean Crisis

by Soner Cagaptayvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Three wars that Turkey is currently involved in, namely in Syria, Libya, and the South Caucasus, suggest that Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s foreign policy has settled into a new phase. Erdoğan is building a “mini Empire” by—often—simultaneously fighting and power- brokering with his Russian homologue, and to this end the Eastern Mediterranean provides ample opportunities for him.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

It’s Not The Energy, Stupid!

by Zafiris Rossidisvia Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

In 2020, with the strong presence of American, Russian, French, Greek, Turkish, Egyptian, Italian, and even German warships, the Eastern Mediterranean has become one of the most militarized seas in the world.

Featured Commentary

Crisis In The Eastern Mediterranean

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Thursday, October 22, 2020

The Eastern Mediterranean, like the Middle East, is a tough neighborhood. The current standoff over natural gas rights among Greece, Turkey, and their respective allies is only the latest example.

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Poster Collection, RU/SU 2165, Hoover Institution Archives.
Background Essay

Ukraine Adrift Between East and West

by Kori Schakevia Strategika
Tuesday, April 1, 2014

The current issue of Strategika asks the question: Are 20th-century-style conventional military assets and strategies still relevant, or are they being replaced by drones, cyber-warfare, counterinsurgency, and satellite technologies?  Using history as a guide, Andrew Roberts, Frederick W. Kagan, and Peter R. Mansoor all argue for the continuing relevance of conventional weapons and soldiers, even though the there is an inherent unpredictability to the exact nature of future conflicts.
 

Poster Collection, RU/SU 1437, Hoover Institution Archives.
Featured Commentary

Vladimir Putin, Murderer of Myths

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Related Commentary

Afghanistan’s Fragile Political Landscape

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Saturday, March 1, 2014
Poster Collection, INT 503, Hoover Institution Archives.
Background Essay

Afghanistan—Graveyard of Empires?

by Max Bootvia Strategika
Saturday, March 1, 2014
Featured Commentary

Afghanistan: There Has To Be A Better Way

by Bing Westvia Strategika
Saturday, March 1, 2014
Poster Collection, IR 132, Hoover Institution Archives.
Featured Commentary

How Good is Afghan Good Enough?

by Joseph Felter via Strategika
Saturday, March 1, 2014

U.S.-led Coalition forces have made significant and hard-earned progress building the capacity of the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) to take the lead in providing the security needed to bring stability, development, and governance to this persistently impoverished country with little history of effective centralized rule.

Poster Collection, RU/SU 2321.9, Hoover Institution Archives.
Featured Commentary

The Folly of Abandoning Afghanistan

by Kimberly Kaganvia Strategika
Saturday, March 1, 2014
Do drones present new military opportunities or are they simply an updated techn

Drones . . . in Context

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Thomas Donnelly discusses the significance of drones within the historical context of advancements in airpower.

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.