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Thursday, July 11, 2019

Issue 59

U.S.–China Trade Tensions
Background Essay
Background Essay

Trade War 2.0—China Sets Sail to Import Innovation, Export Governance

by Christopher R. O’Deavia Strategika
Thursday, July 11, 2019

By agreeing to restart stalled trade talks at their meeting in Osaka last week, President Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping averted a new round of punitive measures in a trade conflict that’s moving into its second year.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

When “Trade Wars” End Badly

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Thursday, July 11, 2019

“I think we’re going to be strategic partners,” said President Donald Trump on June 29 at his Osaka G-20 press conference, in response to a question from Olivia Qi Zhang, a reporter for Caixin, the Chinese news organization. “I think we can help each other. I think, in the end, we can—if the right deal is structured, we can be great for each other.”

Featured Commentary

Demystifying Sino-U.S. Decoupling

by Michael R. Auslinvia Strategika
Thursday, July 11, 2019

“He’s a New York real estate developer,” a non-politically involved acquaintance argues, explaining that President Donald Trump knows that any deal as complex as the one he is trying to negotiate with China over trade will take time, “even years.” That explanation may be as valid as any of the ostensibly more informed takes by professional policy watchers. It also is a useful caution against placing artificial, media-driven timetables on what is turning into the most significant policy showdown between Washington and Beijing since the normalization of diplomatic ties forty years ago.

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Poster Collection, TU 28, Hoover Institution Archives
Background Essay

Turkey at the Crossroads

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013

Turkey is in the midst of an era of dramatic change. That matters in a big way for both American foreign policy and the world, because Turkey is of enormous strategic significance. It is a big and important country. With a population of 74 million people, Turkey is larger than Britain or France, and in area it is slightly larger than Texas. The population is industrious and increasingly wealthy.

Hoover Institution Archives Poster Collection, RU/SU 196
Featured Commentary

The U.S. Should Be Thankful for Turkey

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013

The emergence of Turkey as the most powerful regional player in the Middle East should not surprise Americans. Of all the Middle Eastern Islamic nations, it is the only one that has adapted to the modern world with any degree of success.

Related Commentary

Drones—Saving Our Soldiers

by Admiral Gary Rougheadvia Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013

The warrior’s endless quest is to be more lethal and more precise and to enhance the probabilities of human survival and victory in war.

Related Commentary

The Limitations of Drone Warfare

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013
Related Commentary

Whom Shall We Drone?

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013
Hoover Institution Archives Poster Collection, RU/SU 205
Featured Commentary

Turkey's Struggles Point to the Need for Allies

by Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013

The Republic of Turkey is geographically, politically, and culturally, an odd-looking member in an alliance known as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Turkey has a long coastline washed by the Black Sea, the Sea of Marmara, the Aegean Sea, and the Mediterranean, but it is hundreds of miles from the Atlantic. Turkish democracy for most of NATO’s history could best be described as an aspiration rather than a reality.

Is Russia now an enemy, neutral, irrelevant to US strategic interests, or a poss

Russia, the United States, and the Middle East

by Kiron K. Skinnervia Strategika
Monday, November 25, 2013

Kiron Skinner discusses how the relationship between the United States and Russia bears on the future of foreign policy in the Middle East.

Is Russia now an enemy, neutral, irrelevant to US strategic interests, or a poss

Russia and the United States—the Role of National Character

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Friday, November 22, 2013

Ralph Peters discusses how cultural sensibilities have shaped Russia’s posture in international relations and explain Vladimir Putin’s leadership style.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

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