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Analysis and Commentary

China’s War On Islam

by Michael R. Auslinvia Spectator USA
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Beijing has been ruthlessly willing to use technology and force against the Uighurs.

Analysis and Commentary

The Ancient Rites Of The World’s First Postmodern Society

by Michael R. Auslinvia Foreign Policy
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Why Japan clings so tightly to its traditions—including the monarchy.

Featured

The World’s Next Big Growth Challenge

by Michael Spencevia Project Syndicate
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

The economic performance of lower-income developing countries will be crucial to reducing poverty further. Although these economies face significant headwinds, they could also seize important new growth opportunities – especially with the help of digital platforms.

Interviews

Michael Auslin: In Japan, The Emperor's Throne Passes From Father To Son & What Does It Mean For America And The World? (Part 1)

interview with Michael R. Auslinvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

(Part 1) Hoover Institution fellow Michael Auslin discusses the Japanese emperor's throne passing from father to son.

Hoover Institution Archives Poster Collection, JA 120
Interviews

Michael Auslin: In Japan, The Emperor's Throne Passes From Father To Son & What Does It Mean For America And The World? (Part 2)

interview with Michael R. Auslinvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

(Part 2) Hoover Institution fellow Michael Auslin discusses the Japanese emperor's throne passing from father to son.

Analysis and Commentary

When Reagan Went To China

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, April 29, 2019

I recently suggested to a still-sprightly friend who worked in the Reagan White House that President Reagan’s address at Fudan University in Shanghai—delivered April 30, 1984—was a terrific speech that stands forgotten. My friend texted a pensive reply. “If not largely forgotten, then it’s at least overshadowed by subsequent oratory in a busy rhetorical era.”

Japan’s Eightfold Fence

by Michael R. Auslinvia American Affairs
Monday, April 29, 2019

For Westerners sympathetically acculturated to accepting radical multiculturalism, Japan offers an almost shocking vision of an alternate reality. As engaged as the Japanese are with the world through trade, diplomacy, study, and the like, they also live in a society that celebrates both its uniqueness and its segregation from the rest of the world. Perhaps some of that is natural to an island nation, but this feeling of detachment exists in a society whose wealth has come primarily from economic exchange outside its borders, and the surface of whose national life is largely indistinguishable from the modern West.

Featured

The Old Era Of Sino-U.S. Relations Is Over — And There’s No Going Back

by Michael R. Auslinvia The Washington Post
Monday, April 29, 2019

The 40th anniversary of the normalization of Sino-U.S. relations, which took place on the first day of this year, passed almost unnoticed. Instead of a joint commemoration or high-profile speeches, Washington and Beijing instead traded thinly disguised threats: President Trump signed legislation designed to counter China’s growing power in the Indo-Pacific, while Chinese leader Xi Jinping again urged his military to be prepared to wage war.

In the News

One Country, One System, &C.

mentioning Harvey C. Mansfieldvia National Review
Friday, April 26, 2019

Around Hong Kong, the noose is tightening. This was probably inevitable. In 1997, when Britain handed Hong Kong over to the Chinese government — i.e., the Chinese Communist Party — Beijing promised “one country, two systems.” In other words, Hong Kong could remain free while the rest of China was Communist.

In the News

Metro, Please Don’t Fall For China’s Trap And Buy Their Rail Cars

quoting Andrew Grottovia The Washington Post
Friday, April 26, 2019

The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority did the right thing when it extended the deadline for proposals from manufacturers for its next series of rail cars. WMATA’s decision is good news, provided that it addresses cybersecurity concerns related to the purchase of new rail cars.

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