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Analysis and Commentary

Pentagon Invests In High Tech, Then It’s Stolen. What’s The Point?

by Markos Kounalakisvia Sacramento Bee
Thursday, February 15, 2018

Technology born and bred in the USA has been copied and deployed by Iran against Israel. Crossing into Israeli airspace from Syria last weekend, a trespassing unmanned aerial vehicle, or UAV, aggressively swept across Israel’s border, only to be tracked and blown out of the air by one of the Israeli Defense Force’s American-made Apache helicopters.

Analysis and Commentary

Perspective On Yellen

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Thursday, February 15, 2018

Donna Borak of CNN Money interviewed me early in February for her piece on outgoing Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen.The piece is "Yellen's historic legacy: Wise caution and a successful recovery," CNN Money, February 3, 2018.

Analysis and Commentary

Why Bryan Caplan Won His Gasoline Bet

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, February 14, 2018

For some reason, I didn't know about co-blogger Bryan Caplan's bet about gasoline prices with Tyler Cowen, but if I had, I would have taken his side of the bet.

Featured

Deficits

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Wednesday, February 14, 2018

The graph is federal surplus (up) or deficit (down), not counting interest costs, divided by potential GDP. I made it for another purpose, but it is interesting in these fiscally ... interesting .. times.Taking interest costs out is a way of assessing overall fiscal stability. If you pay the...

In the News

Media Protecting Obama's Legacy Of Corruption

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia News Max
Wednesday, February 14, 2018

As Victor Davis Hanson writes in Jewish World Review: “Progressives are not supposed to destroy requested emails, 'acid wash' hard drives, spread unverified and paid-for opposition research among government agencies, or use the DOJ and FBI to obtain warrants to snoop on the communications of American citizens.”

Interviews

The Olympian Challenges Facing America's High Schools

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly (Thomas B. Fordham Institute)
Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses what the recent graduation rate scandals say about the state of the American high schools. 

Featured

The Father Of The Taylor Rule: A Defence Of Rules At WES 2018

featuring John B. Taylorvia The Boar
Monday, February 5, 2018

John B. Taylor’s speech at the Warwick Economics Summit offered meaningful insight into the challenges that continue to face monetary policymakers all over the world.Taylor is currently Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University, and is best known for his seminal contribution to monetary economics, the Taylor rule. Given Taylor’s longstanding distinguished status in the field of monetary economics, it is essential that future leaders of the world economy heed his advice.

Interviews

Adam J. White, "The Coming Revolution In Administrative Law: Will A 20th-Century Compromise Rule The 21st Century?"

interview with Adam J. Whitevia The Federalist Society
Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Adam White discusses the coming changes in administrative law.

Featured

The Precedent For Trump's Administration Isn't Nixon—It's Clinton

by Niall Ferguson, Manuel Rincon-Cruzvia The Atlantic
Wednesday, February 14, 2018

History is at least as much about the structures of power as it is about the personalities of “great men”—or terrible ones. Of course, a president’s idiosyncrasies matter, and the outsized and outrageous personality of the current president of the United States has riveted the public and press.

Analysis and Commentary

Caligula's Wish

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Tuesday, February 13, 2018

It was the spring of 1960, and a group of military officers had just seized control of the government and the national media, imposing an information blackout to suppress the coordination of any threats to their coup. But inconveniently for the conspirators, a highly anticipated soccer game between Turkey and Scotland was scheduled to take place in the capital two weeks after their takeover. Matches like this were broadcast live on national radio, with an announcer calling the game, play by play. People all across Turkey would huddle around their sets, cheering on the national team.

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