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In the News

Deepfake Videos May Have Unwitting Ally In US Media

quoting Amy Zegartvia The Hill
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Deepfake videos are likely to pose a grave threat to the 2020 election, unless the media adopts stringent policies to distinguish real videos from sophisticated forgeries, experts say.

Interviews

Jamil Jaffer: Protecting Elections From Interference

interview with Jamil Jaffervia Bloomberg
Monday, August 12, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Jamil Jaffer discusses election security including vote manipulation, as well as overt and covert influence via social media.

In the News

Help Wanted: American Ambassador In Moscow

quoting Michael McFaulvia The Hill
Monday, August 12, 2019

The imminent departure of Ambassador Jon Huntsman from Moscow creates a huge hole in America’s Russia team. Other countries have the ability to challenge the United States in the military or economic fields, but only Russia represents a potential existential threat to the republic. Mr. Huntsman’s successor will need a unique set of traits to deal with the increased tensions between the United States and the Russian Federation.

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David Kennedy, Andrew Roberts, and Stephen Kotkin Discuss the Big Three of the 20th Century: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin

interview with David M. Kennedy, Stephen Kotkin, Andrew Robertsvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, August 1, 2019

AUDIO ONLY

Accomplished historians David Kennedy, author of Freedom from fear; Andrew Roberts, author of Churchill: Walking with Destiny; and Stephen Kotkin, author of Stalin: Waiting for Hitler discuss why the peaceful new international order that Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin agreed to establish after crushing Nazi Germany turned instead into each of the Allies pursuing their own national interests amid the Cold War. 

In the News

Democracy Is Under Attack. But How To Protect It While Trump Is In The White House?

quoting Larry Diamondvia The Washington Post
Thursday, August 1, 2019

Two new books offer contrasting plans -- one global, another national -- to preserve freedom.

In the News

Review: How China Is Shaping California Skylines And American Democracy

featuring Larry Diamondvia Datebook (San Fransisco Chronicle)
Monday, July 22, 2019

Larry Diamond has studied democracy for 40 years. He’s seen governments in every conceivable state of health, and he’s not easily alarmed.

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The Libertarian: The Moon — 50 Years On

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Thursday, July 25, 2019

What can Apollo 11 teach us about what government can (and can’t) do.

In the News

Yes, Dictators Are Ascendant. But People All Over The World Are Fighting Back.

quoting Larry Diamondvia The Washington Post
Sunday, July 21, 2019

By now it’s old news that the world is living through a retreat of democracy. For a dozen consecutive years, the number of countries where liberty has declined has exceeded those where it has expanded, according to Freedom House. Autocrats are stepping up repression; populist movements are rising in Europe and the United States. China and Russia are offering new models of high-tech dictatorship.

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Solzhenitsyn Was Here

by Bertrand M. Patenaudevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

The celebrated Soviet exile came, did some research in the Hoover Archives, and began his scrutiny of the American scene. Notes on a memorable visitor.

In the News

Britain’s Theresa May Gave Putin The Cold Shoulder. Trump Joked With Him.

quoting Michael McFaulvia The Washington Post
Friday, June 28, 2019

As they met with Vladimir Putin in Osaka, Japan, for the G-20 summit, British prime minister Theresa May and President Trump presented sharp contrasts in their public greeting of the Russian president.

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