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In the News

Sceptic Or Believer?

mentioning Bjorn Lomborgvia Ahram Online
Monday, October 7, 2019

Our subject is climate change. It is not one we are particularly fond of but the mainstream media is obsessed with it, inundating us with headlines and articles, so here we go again to examine the issue one more time.

Featured

Corporations Will Do Less For Society If They Are Mandated To Do More

by Lee Ohanianvia The Hill
Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin recently criticized 181 CEOs of leading corporations, including Apple, Amazon and Walmart, who signed a statement redefining the purpose of a corporation.

Analysis and Commentary

How Vladimir Putin Is Outplaying The U.S. In Africa

by Grant T. Harris, Michael McFaulvia The Washington Post
Tuesday, September 17, 2019

President Trump and his administration remain deeply divided on several foreign policy issues. Take Russia, for example. While the president continues to pursue a broad rapprochement with Vladimir Putin, the diplomats, soldiers and Treasury officials who work for him have maintained a tough line on the Kremlin.

Condoleezza Rice gives the before-dinner remarks titled “US Global Leadership?”
In the News

Condoleezza Rice & Philip Zelikow: To Build A Better World

featuring Condoleezza Ricevia UVA Miller Center
Thursday, September 12, 2019

Condoleezza Rice will visit the University of Virginia on Thursday, September 12. Rice, the 66th U.S. Secretary of State, has a distinguished career in both academia and public service, ranging from her current position at Stanford University to George W. Bush’s National Security Advisor.

In the News

New Scramble For Africa: Africa Will Be Next Major Battlefield In ‘Cold War’ Between The US And China, Experts Say

quoting Niall Fergusonvia The Sun
Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Africa looks set to be the next major battlefield in an emerging "Cold War" between the US and China, experts have claimed.

 

Interviews

Markos Kounalakis: 'What Comes Next? How The World's Most Violent Places Recover'

interview with Markos Kounalakisvia World Affairs
Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Markos Kounalakis talks about how violent and weak states transform into stable ones.

In the News

The Path To Sustainability For The Liberian Education Advancement Programme (LEAP)

quoting Eric Hanushekvia Ventures
Thursday, July 11, 2019

In 2016, Liberia – one of the poorest countries in the world – embarked on the world’s most innovative public-private partnership in education. Its government was determined to improve learning outcomes for children.

In the News

Nigeria’s Dwindling Tribe Of Democrats

quoting Larry Diamondvia The Nation
Sunday, June 23, 2019

On the face of it, Nigeria qualifies to be called an emerging democracy. We just celebrated 20 years of uninterrupted civil rule with transition from government to government facilitated by elections no matter how flawed. We have a functioning, albeit high maintenance, parliament in place and the wheels of justice keep grinding ever so slowly in the courts. Our citizens and media are relatively free to express opinion and disseminate information even if the thin boundary between the hatred and fiction are breached with regularity.

Featured

Democracy Demotion

by Larry Diamondvia Foreign Affairs
Wednesday, June 12, 2019

For three decades beginning in the mid-1970s, the world experienced a remarkable expansion of democracy—the so-called third wave—with authoritarian regimes falling or reforming across the world. By 1993, a majority of states with populations over one million had become democracies. Levels of freedom, as measured by Freedom House, were steadily rising as well. In most years between 1991 and 2005, many more countries gained freedom than lost it.

In the News

Taylor’s Rule: Too High, Too Low – Where Should Interest Rates Go?

interview with John B. Taylorvia Biz News
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Taylor’s Rule is an interest rate forecasting model invented by John Taylor in the early 90s. And according to Investopedia “it’s a proposed guideline for how central banks should alter interest rates in response to changes in economic conditions.” In South Africa, the Reserve Bank’s mandate is very topical at present, which in turn sets up a discussion around interest rates. SARB’s current mandate is tailored around a targeted inflation band of 3-6%, with the repo rate currently at 6.75%. 

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