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Ronald Reagan and Pope John Paul II: The Partnership that Changed the World

interview with Edwin Meese IIIvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, February 19, 2019

AUDIO ONLY

Former attorney general Edwin Meese III explains the relationship between President Reagan and Pope John Paul II and how their collaboration helped end the Cold War.

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Ronald Reagan And Pope John Paul II: The Partnership That Changed The World

interview with Edwin Meese IIIvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Former attorney general Edwin Meese III explains the relationship between President Reagan and Pope John Paul II and how their collaboration helped end the Cold War.

The New Nihilism

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Defining Ideas
Monday, February 18, 2019

The Trump-loathing American left has spiraled out of control.

Featured

‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ — Political Style

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, February 18, 2019

Watching the movie “Bohemian Rhapsody” on a long-haul flight last week, I was reminded that brinkmanship was the way Freddie Mercury lived his life — not only his bisexual love life, but also his musical life. It was brinkmanship that led to the release of “Bohemian Rhapsody” as a single. The movie casts Mike Myers as a stereotypical record label executive. “What on earth is it about?” Ray Foster rants incredulously. 

Analysis and Commentary

Wisdom From Tony Lip

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Saturday, February 16, 2019

My wife and I went to see the movie Green Book and thoroughly enjoyed it. I highly recommend it. I won’t bother recounting the story; that’s easy to find on line. Instead I want to remark on a line in the movie.

Related Commentary

Another Reset with Russia? Sure, If We Accept the Unacceptable.

by Hy Rothsteinvia Strategika
Friday, February 15, 2019

Any reset with Russia must first assess whether Russia’s policy interests are reconcilable with the interests of the U.S. and NATO. For President Putin and Russian elites, the collapse of the Soviet Union was the worst calamity of the 20th century. Russians have always felt a deep-seated and occasionally real sense of vulnerability from the West. For many Russians, the security dilemma is very real.

Related Commentary

Nyet to the Reset

by Robert G. Kaufmanvia Strategika
Friday, February 15, 2019

Any reset with Putin’s increasingly illiberal and expansionist Russia is a triumph of hope over experience. Unrealistic realists underestimate the importance of ideology and regime type in assessing Russia’s calculus of its ambitions and interest.

In the News

How The US Actually Financed The Second World War

quoting Lee Ohanianvia Financial Times Alphaville
Wednesday, February 13, 2019

[Subscription Required] In March of 1951, a year into the Korean War, the US Treasury offered long-term notes at 2 3/4 per cent in exchange for short-term notes at 2 1/2 per cent. According to a narrative written half a century later by the Richmond Fed, the Federal Reserve supported the price of the long-term notes, but: only up to a limited volume it had agreed on with the Treasury.

The Nationalist Revival
Analysis and Commentary

The Nationalist Revival

interview with Jack Goldsmith, John Judisvia Security by the Book
Thursday, February 14, 2019

Trade, Immigration, and the Revolt Against Globalization.

In the News

An Original Hard Rock Valentine's Day Story

featuring Herbert Hoover, Lou Henry Hoover, Hoover Institutionvia Mining Journal
Thursday, February 14, 2019

This week 120 years ago, two young honeymooners were on their way from California to China and a lifetime of adventure.

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Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.