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Essays

Unlocking the Power of Technology for Better Governance

by Jeb Bushvia Governance In An Emerging New World
Monday, October 7, 2019

The rapid advances of the digital age have radically transformed our private and work lives by making information more accessible, communication faster, and businesses more competitive. But while our private lives have been so quickly transformed, government has been slow to respond. Embracing the technological advances of the last few decades promises to make government more efficient, transparent, responsive, and effective.

Blank Section (Placeholder)EssaysAnalysis and Commentary

Verified Accountability

by Evelyn Douekvia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, September 17, 2019

The way platforms currently conduct content moderation has been delegitimized, and new forms of governance will need to emerge to meet the demands of the moment. Semi-independent and transparent self-regulatory oversight mechanisms offer significant advantages. As the actors closest to the front line, platforms will always need to play a significant role in drawing lines for online speech, given the high-volume, fast-moving and context-dependent nature of the decisions involved.

Total Volunteer Force by Hoover fellow Tim Kane
Essays

Total Volunteer Force

by Timothy Kanevia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Tim Kane identifies and examines the underlying causes of personnel dysfunction in the US armed forces and suggests specific, decentralizing reforms to Pentagon policies. His proposals aim to move personnel strategies further along the spectrum of volunteerism, emphasize greater individual agency during all stages of a US military career, and restore command authority to colonels and captains that has been missing since the centralization of the 1960s.

EssaysEconomyFeatured

A Closer Look At The Left’s Agenda: Scientific, Economic, And Numerical Illiteracy On The Campaign Trail

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Institution Press
Monday, July 8, 2019

Many of the Left’s recent policy proposals are not only quite radical, but scientifically, economically, and numerically illiterate. They are crowding out discussion of serious proposals to deal with the legitimate issues raised. A closer look reveals, for example, that Medicare for All and the Green New Deal wildly violate the laws of supply and demand, physics, and arithmetic.

EssaysBlank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Cutting The Fat Tail Of Climate Risk: Carbon Backstop Technologies As A Climate Insurance Policy

by Jeremy Carl, David Fedorvia Hoover Institution Press
Monday, May 20, 2019

A variety of promising technologies that might be considered “carbon backstops” are now emerging. Such technologies would be impactful in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, scalable, and available for rapid deployment—but too expensive to justify broad deployment today. 

Essays

On “Forces of History”: Easy as One-Two- Three? Not Exactly

by Charles Hillvia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

The tension between the concepts of “civilization” and “the forces of history” can be tracked around the world from deep antiquity until at least the early 20th century. Since then, for many political reasons, neither the idea of civilization or historically transformative forces has been considered worthy of attention or even to possess intellectual legitimacy for serious world leaders. This may now however be changing as, for example, the European Union’s disregard for the continent’s civilization (as in the determination not to refer to Christianity in its draft constitutions) has troubled many.

Essays

The Democratic Distemper

by Morris P. Fiorinavia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

I have been tasked to write on governance in the contemporary era, a time when many knowledgeable commentators believe that democracies across the western world are performing poorly in the face of new challenges arising from demographic and technological change. Commentary on the state of contemporary liberal democracy clearly tends toward the pessimistic: The vague and persistent feeling that democracies have become ungovernable has been growing steadily in western Europe. The case of Britain has become the most dramatic example of this malaise…

Essays

Governance Challenges to Infrastructure and the Built Environment Posed by Climate Change

by Alice Hillvia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

The Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii sits two miles above sea level and over 2,200 miles from the nearest continent. For decades, scientists in this government laboratory have collected data on the atmosphere. In recent years, the world’s eyes have been fixed on a particular set of numbers coming out of Mauna Loa—readings of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), a key heat-trapping gas associated with climate change. Since the late 19th century, CO2 emissions have grown to unprecedented levels. In 2013, the daily average concentration of CO2 surpassed 400 parts per million for the first time in modern history. Emissions of CO2 continue to rise, reaching the largest amount ever recorded in 2018, according to the International Energy Agency. Greenhouse gas emissions have resulted in an increase of average global surface temperatures of approximately 1°C since the 1880s.

Essays

How Will Demographic Transformations Affect Democracy in the Coming Decades?

by Jack A. Goldstone, Larry Diamondvia Governance In An Emerging New World
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

In 2007–2009 a major drought—the worst in forty years—struck northern Syria, the country’s agricultural breadbasket and a region that had already been suffering from loss of irrigation subsidies and water shortages. Syria’s young and fast-growing population meant that over a million people in the region were directly affected by the drought. In “the 2007/2008 agriculture season, nearly 75 percent of these households suffered total crop failure.” Hundreds of thousands left their lands and moved to the cities of Aleppo, Hama, and Damascus. Because Syria already was suffering from widespread popular discontent over political exclusion and corruption, these refugees added to the existing weight of urban misery and anger with the regime. Two years later, when a rebellion broke out in southern Syria, revolt quickly spread to these northern cities and precipitated civil war. The war in turn created millions more refugees, who spread to Lebanon, Jordan, and Turkey, and then to Europe, where a sudden surge of over one million war refugees sought asylum in 2015.

EssaysBlank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Ready For Tomorrow: Seven Strategies For Climate-Resilient Infrastructure

by Alice Hill, Douglas Mason, Joanne R. Potter, Molly Hellmuth, Bilal Ayyub, Jack W. Bakervia Hoover Institution Press
Friday, April 19, 2019

As the impacts of climate change are felt more forcefully around the globe, decision makers are asking, with increasing urgency, how they can make their communities and businesses more resilient. One obvious place to start is infrastructure. To address this, the Hoover Institution convened a yearlong collaboration with leading experts and practitioners in development banks, government agencies, universities, private firms, non-governmental organizations, and professional associations. It drew on diverse perspectives to the challenges of resilience, including physical and social science, engineering, policy, finance, and education. The resulting paper lays out seven strategies for developing more climate-resilient infrastructure. 

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