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Part I The Second World Wars with Victor Davis Hanson
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Part I: The Second World Wars With Victor Davis Hanson

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, November 28, 2017

How the first global conflict was fought and won.

Scott Adams
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How To Fail At Almost Everything With Scott Adams

interview with Scott Adamsvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, September 14, 2017

Scott Adams on Life, Business, Talent Stacks, and Trump.

Pat Sajak and Peter Robinson
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The Speech That Defined A Presidency

interview with Peter M. Robinson, Pat Sajakvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Pat Sajak Interviews Peter Robinson about the Brandenburg Gate Speech.

Niall Ferguson on Uncommon Knowledge
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Niall Ferguson On Kissinger The Idealist

interview with Niall Fergusonvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Niall Ferguson discusses the education of Henry Kissinger from 1923 to 1968, beginning as a boy fleeing Nazi Germany to becoming an influential and powerful statesman.

Hoover fellow Robinson, left, and David Mamet, right

David Mamet on conservatism

with David Mametvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, November 20, 2013

This week on Uncommon Knowledge, playwright David Mamet discusses his book The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture and his conversion to conservatism. Mamet explains how, by studying Jewish and Christian texts such as the Talmud and the Bible, he came to approach arguments from a new perspective that aligned itself with conservative politics. Throughout the interview, Mamet discusses his newly found conservative position on several issues, including social justice and civil rights, the decline of the family and the sexual revolution, affirmative action and race, and domestic politics and foreign policy. (35:34)

Tom Wolfe is the author of numerous bestselling works of fiction and non-fiction.

Author Tom Wolfe discusses his latest novel, Back to Blood

with Tom Wolfevia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, July 23, 2013

This week on Uncommon Knowledge, author Tom Wolfe discusses the ideas and inspirations for Back to Blood, a story of decadence and the new America. In the book, Wolfe paints a story of a decaying culture enduring constant uncertainty. Heroes are spurned and abused, and values are dissolving; yet the message seems to be to stick with the good values. (47:32)

Justice Antonin Scalia discusses the premise of his book, Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges.

Uncommon Knowledge with Justice Antonin Scalia

with Antonin Scaliavia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, October 31, 2012

This week on Uncommon Knowledge, Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia visits for a wide-ranging interview on subjects including the living Constitution, Roe v. Wade, Congress’s relationship to the Court, and his new book, Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts. “I think it took the American people a while to figure out what was going on, maybe 30 years. Once they have figured out that the Supreme Court is essentially rewriting the Constitution term by term, the old criteria for appointing and confirming judges no longer applies.” (48:47)

Thomas Sowell discusses Intellectuals and Society on Uncommon Knowledge.

Thomas Sowell discusses his essay “‘Trickle Down Theory’ and ‘Tax Cuts for the Rich.’”

with Thomas Sowellvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, September 17, 2012

This week on Uncommon Knowledge, Hoover fellow and author Thomas Sowell discusses his essay “‘Trickle Down Theory’ and ‘Tax Cuts for the Rich.’” (39:52)
“Now anyone who studied history knows that for the first 150 years of this country the federal government did not intervene when the economy turned down. And all that time the downturns all corrected themselves; one of the most classic examples was under Warren G. Harding when, during his first year in office, he found the unemployment rate at 11.7 percent. He did absolutely nothing; he did not spend more government money, he cut back on spending. The Federal Reserve had the interest rates up at 6 or 7 percent, not down at 1 percent, where they are now. The next year unemployment was at 6.7 percent; the year after that it was 2.4 percent. So the economy has recuperative powers. I mean employers have an incentive to hire people. Workers have an incentive to get jobs. Lenders have incentives to lend.”

George W. Bush

George W. Bush

with George W. Bushvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, July 18, 2012

This week on Uncommon Knowledge President George W. Bush discusses postpresidential life and his work at the Bush Institute. (1:03:21)
“I believe we are a blessed nation; that is, therefore, we have a sense of responsibility to the extent we can to help others. In this case there was a pandemic destroying an entire generation of people. And I didn’t see how I could be president of a powerful, the most powerful, and the richest nation and not lend our support to saving lives. It would have been unconscionable not to act. So I thought it was in our moral interest to act. I also knew it was in our national security interest to act.”

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Are There Limits On Emergency Powers? With John Yoo And Richard Epstein

interview with John Yoo, Richard A. Epsteinvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, January 25, 2019

Richard Epstein and John Yoo deconstruct presidential powers concerning the government shutdown, the Mueller investigation, and the potential for impeachment by the Democrat-controlled House.

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