Hoover Deputy Director David Brady Named Davies Family Senior Fellow

Tuesday, September 28, 2010
David Brady talks about the upcoming elections to the Hoover Board of Overseers
Image credit: 
Stanford Visual Arts
David Brady talks about the upcoming elections to the Hoover Board of Overseers
Image credit: 
Stanford Visual Arts

John Raisian, the Tad and Dianne Taube Director at the Hoover Institution, formally announced the Davies Family Fellowship at the Hoover Institution at a dinner on September 28. The dinner, hosted by Paul Lewis Davies Jr., Hoover overseer; Paul Lewis “Lew” Davies III, Hoover overseer, and his wife Pilar; and Laura Davies Mateo, celebrated the appointment of Deputy Director and Senior Fellow David Brady as the Davies Family Senior Fellow.

“We are delighted to lend our name to a fellowship that honors an outstanding individual such as David Brady. His considerable knowledge of national politics is an asset to the institution, and we’ve long supported his work,” said the senior Davies.

Brady is also the Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science and Leadership Values in the Stanford Graduate School of Business and a professor of political science in the School of Humanities and Sciences at the university.

Brady has published eight books and more than a hundred articles in journals and books. Among his most recent publications are Leadership and Growth (World Bank Publications, 2010) coedited with Michael Spence, Revolving Gridlock: Politics and Policy from Carter to Bush II (Westview Press, 2006), and Red and Blue Nation? Characteristics and Causes of America’s Polarized Politics with Pietro Nivola (2007).

Brady, a Hoover fellow since 1989, has been on a continuing appointment at Stanford University since 1987. He was associate dean from 1997 to 2001; a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences from 1985 to 1986 and again in 2001–2; and the Autrey Professor at Rice University, 1980–87.

In 1987 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has won the Dinkenspiel Award for service to undergraduates, the Richard Lyman Prize for service to alumni, and the first Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award given at Stanford.