Hoover Institution hosts Economic Recovery Conference

Thursday, October 20, 2011
John B. Taylor is the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics at Hoover
Image credit: 
John LeSchofs, Stanford Visual Arts
John B. Taylor is the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics at Hoover
Image credit: 
John LeSchofs, Stanford Visual Arts
George P. Shultz is the Thomas W. and Susan B. Ford Distinguished Fellow
Image credit: 
John LeSchofs, Stanford Visual Arts
Allan Meltzer is a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution
Image credit: 
John LeSchofs, Stanford Visual Arts

The Hoover Institution’s Working Group on Economic Policy and Stanford University’s Center for Latin American Studies  hosted an all-day conference titled “The Uneven Recovery: Emerging Markets Versus Developed Economies” on Friday, October 14, 2011. The economic recovery in Mexico has been robust in the past two years, especially in contrast with the slow recovery in the United States. This remarkable unevenness characterizes the recoveries of other emerging market economies in contrast with developed economies as a whole. The one-day conference brought together economists with extensive policy making experience in Mexico and the United States to explore the reasons for the differences between the two economies and to develop the policy implications.

Participants included George P. Shultz, the Thomas W. and Susan B. Ford Distinguished Fellow, John B. Taylor, the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics, Michael J. Boskin, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, and Stephen Haber, the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow, as well as a number of visiting fellows and special guests, including Pedro C. Aspe, finance minister of Mexico, 1988–94 and cochairman, Evercore Partners, and Francisco Gil Díaz, finance minister of Mexico, 2000–2006 and executive president, Telefónica, Mexico and Central America.

The Working Group on Economic Policy will sponsor another conference on December 2, 2011, which will discuss the slow economic recovery in the United States.