Adam J. White

Research Fellow
Biography: 

Adam J. White is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, and director of the Center for the Study of the Administrative State at George Mason University's Antonin Scalia Law School, where he also teaches Administrative Law. He writes widely on the administrative state, the Supreme Court, the Constitution, and regulatory policy, with special focus on energy policy and financial regulation. 

He was recently appointed to the Administrative Conference of the United States, a federal advisory board focused on improving federal agencies' practices. He also serves on the leadership council of the American Bar Association's Administrative Law Section; on the executive committee of the Federalist Society's Administrative Law Practice Group; and on the board of directors of LandCAN, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting conservation on working lands.

His articles appear in The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, Commentary, and other publications, and he is a contributing editor for National Affairs, City Journal, and The New Atlantis. He previously practiced law at Boyden Gray & Associates PLLC and Baker Botts LLP, litigating regulatory and constitutional issues. After graduating from the University of Iowa and Harvard Law School, he clerked for Judge David B. Sentelle on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. 

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Back To The Future: The Necessary Constitutional Restraints On Administrative Power (Old Time Badger Edition)

by Adam J. Whitevia Medium
Thursday, March 28, 2019

The constitutional legitimacy of modern administrative power is premised upon energetic judicial and legislative oversight, restraint, and reform. Today’s liberty-minded reformers stress this point—and they’re not the first.

In the News

Adam White On The Mueller Report

featuring Adam J. Whitevia Antonin Law School
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

For nearly two years, President Trump’s critics placed immense weight on Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation of allegations that Candidate Trump colluded with Russia before the 2016 election, and that President Trump obstructed justice after his 2017 inauguration.

Analysis and Commentary

A Brief Observation On The Self-Serving Use Of Institutions

by Adam J. Whitevia Medium
Tuesday, March 26, 2019
I’ve already sketched out some insta-reactions to the Barr Letter’s summary of the Mueller Report at Politico and Commentary. But let me add one further thought, briefly, on President Trump, his opponents, and the proper understanding of institutions.
Analysis and Commentary

Adam White: Kisor V. Wilkie

with Adam J. Whitevia The Federalist Society
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Adam White analyzes the past, present, and future of Auer deference in Kisor v. Wilkie. 

In the News

Should Mueller Testify?

quoting Adam J. Whitevia National Review
Monday, March 25, 2019

Jonah mentions in passing the possibility that Mueller will testify before Congress. Adam White makes a strong case that he shouldn’t, and that Congress shouldn’t ask him to: “[W]hen the President’s critics now begin to demand that Mueller come and discuss publicly his interpretation of facts which Mueller himself declined to make the basis of a recommendation to indict, they demand that Mueller commit precisely the same error that [James] Comey infamously made.”

Interviews

Adam White: Border Security National Emergency Declaration

interview with Adam J. Whitevia C-SPAN
Monday, March 25, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Adam White joins a panel discussion about President Trump’s border security emergency declaration. They talk about the constitutional and statutory implications of the president’s declaration and make suggestions for what they think Congress should do in response.

Analysis and Commentary

The Ironies Of Mueller’s Endgame

by Adam J. Whitevia Commentary
Monday, March 25, 2019

For nearly two years, President Trump’s critics placed immense weight on Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation of allegations that Candidate Trump colluded with Russia before the 2016 election, and that President Trump obstructed justice after his 2017 inauguration. So, in the immediate aftermath of Mueller’s investigation and Attorney General Barr’s brief summary to Congress, it is more than a little ironic to find President Trump’s critics now downplaying Mueller’s conclusions that there is no evidence that Trump colluded, and insufficient evidence that Trump obstructed justice.

Analysis and Commentary

Has The President Been Exonerated?

by Adam J. Whitevia Politico
Sunday, March 24, 2019

We asked top legal experts to decode the attorney general’s summary of the Mueller report—and what it means for Donald Trump.

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Reasonable Disagreements: Warren And Holder Want To Break Tech And The Supreme Court

interview with Richard A. Epstein, Adam J. Whitevia Reasonable Disagreements
Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Would breaking apart tech companies and packing the Supreme Court achieve anything positive?

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Democracy, Delegation, And Distrust

by Adam J. Whitevia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Congress and the Presidency in the Age of Trump.

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