Bjorn Lomborg

Visiting Fellow
Biography: 

Bjorn Lomborg is a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution. 

Dr. Bjorn Lomborg is president of the Copenhagen Consensus Center and visiting professor at Copenhagen Business School. His numerous books include The Skeptical Environmentalist, Cool It, How to Spend $75 Billion to Make the World a Better Place, The Nobel Laureates’ Guide to the Smartest Targets for the World: 2016–2030, and Prioritizing Development: A Cost Benefit Analysis of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals

The Copenhagen Consensus Center is a think tank that researches the smartest solutions for the world's biggest problems, advising policy makers and philanthropists how to spend their money most effectively. It brings together many of the world’s top economists, including seven Nobel laureates, to set priorities both at a global and a country or state level. It is the winner of Prospect magazine’s 2016 Think Tank of the Year award in the International Affairs category for think tanks based in the United States. The center’s work was commended by the judges as being “truly innovative and global in its scope.” In the 2018 Global Go To Think Tank Index Report, Copenhagen Consensus was once again acknowledged for having launched one of the top 20 advocacy campaigns anywhere in the world, for the sixth year running. The Economist said: “Copenhagen Consensus is an outstanding, visionary idea and deserves global coverage.”

For this work, Lomborg was named one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world. In 2011 and 2012, Lomborg was named among the Top 100 Global Thinkers by Foreign Policy “for looking more right than ever on the politics of climate change.” In 2008 he was named “one of the 50 people who could save the planet” by the UK Guardian. In 2005 and 2008, Foreign Policy and Prospect magazine called him "one of the top 100 public intellectuals,” and in 2008 Esquire named him “one of the world’s 75 most influential people of the 21st century.”

Lomborg is a frequent participant in public debates on policy issues. His analysis and commentaries appear regularly in such prestigious publications as the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, the Economist, Foreign Affairs, the Atlantic, Forbes, the Globe and Mail, theGuardian, the Telegraph, the Sunday Times, the Australian, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, and Der Spiegel.

Filter By:

Topic

Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Why Family Planning Is A Smart Investment

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Project Syndicate
Monday, October 21, 2019

Achieving universal access to contraception would save and improve millions of lives, and put societies on a faster track to shared prosperity. With so much at stake, the world should be devoting far more attention and resources to this goal.

In the News

Activist Investor And ‘Skeptical Environmentalist’ Face Off On Climate Change

featuring Bjorn Lomborgvia Energy Voice
Thursday, October 10, 2019

Bjorn Lomborg, president of the Copenhagen Consensus Centre and author of The Skeptical Environmentalist, was making the case that climate change “is not the end of the world”.

Blank Section (Placeholder)

Polluters and Scapegoats

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Banning plastic bags won’t save the planet. Real progress will have to extend well beyond empty gestures.

In the News

Sceptic Or Believer?

mentioning Bjorn Lomborgvia Ahram Online
Monday, October 7, 2019

Our subject is climate change. It is not one we are particularly fond of but the mainstream media is obsessed with it, inundating us with headlines and articles, so here we go again to examine the issue one more time.

Analysis and Commentary

On Climate Change, Humanity Is Not ‘Evil’

by Bjorn Lomborgvia The Globe and Mail
Thursday, September 26, 2019

Speaking at the United Nations, 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg said that if humanity really understands the science of climate change and still fails to act, we’re “evil.” This is because climate change means “people are dying.” Helpfully, she also told us what we must do to act correctly: In a bit more than eight years, we will have exhausted our remaining allowance for carbon emissions, so we must shut down everything running on fossil fuels by 2028.

Featured

How Climate Policies Hurt The Poor

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Project Syndicate
Thursday, September 26, 2019

The world is in great danger of spending scarce resources on climate policies that hurt rather than help its poorest people. Governments should instead focus on growth-enhancing measures such as trade liberalization, which provide a pathway to increased welfare and greater equality.

Interviews

Bjorn Lomborg: Green Innovation Trumps Overspending When Tackling Climate Change

interview with Bjorn Lomborgvia Fox Business
Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Bjorn Lomborg discusses why the hefty price tag that will be attached to combating climate change may not solve the issue.

Analysis and Commentary

The Danger Of Climate Doomsayers

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Project Syndicate
Monday, August 19, 2019

We need to solve climate change, but we also need to make sure that the cure isn’t more painful than the disease. Abandoning fossil fuels as quickly as possible, as many environmental activists demand, would slow the growth that has lifted billions of people out of poverty.

Featured

Vegetarianism As Climate Virtue Signaling

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Wall Street Journal
Thursday, August 8, 2019

‘Eat Less Meat” is the typical headline used to present a new United Nations report on climate change released Thursday. The report correctly points to the need to improve global food systems, but pundits are fixating on the supposed need for people in rich countries to change their dining habits radically. This is an ineffective and unachievable policy response.

Analysis and Commentary

The Nutrition Challenge

by Bjorn Lomborgvia Project Syndicate
Thursday, July 18, 2019

Additional investments in early childhood nutrition are crucial, and should be a high priority for donor and recipient governments, multilateral development organizations, and philanthropic foundations. The case for such spending is clear, and the payoffs will almost certainly be enormous.

Pages