Colin Dueck

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Strategic Planning for the New Administration

by Colin Dueckvia Analysis
Thursday, December 15, 2016

The next administration will face urgent, practical questions of how to organize its National Security Council decision-making process while developing a strong foreign policy strategy.  Strategic planning can help to make international success more likely, in part by providing the president with clear, well-informed policy options.  Yet no process can work if it does not fit the individual president.  To that end, the following essay examines the new president-elect's decision-making style, and then outlines six specific NSC recommendations: 1. Learn from private sector experience, 2. Develop and execute a meaningful national security strategy early on, 3. Restore a proper balance of responsibilities between the NSC and line departments and agencies, 4. Encourage the president's national security adviser to play the roles of honest broker, policy entrepreneur, and presidential agent, 5. Appoint and empower a strategic planning directorate on the NSC staff, and 6. Consider creating an effective strategic planning board.  In the end, the case is made that strategy is possible; bureaucratic consensus overrated; and defeatism unhelpful.

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The Iran Deal And Foreign Policy In 2016

by Colin Dueckvia The Caravan
Thursday, October 15, 2015

President Obama has made the Iran nuclear deal a centerpiece of his foreign policy legacy.  Republicans rallied in opposition, along with key Senate Democrats, but because of a prearranged agreement with the White House, opponents were unable to block the Iran deal or even cast a dissenting vote.

The Accommodator: Obama’s Foreign Policy

by Colin Dueckvia Policy Review
Saturday, October 1, 2011

Conceding much up front, garnering little in return

Regaining a Realistic Foreign Policy

by Colin Dueckvia Policy Review
Sunday, August 1, 2010

What Theodore Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan teach