John Cohrssen

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Turning over a New (Organic) Leaf

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Hoover Digest
Monday, October 29, 2018

Bioengineered crops help farmers and feed increasing numbers of people, but the organic industry still rejects them. New organic labels could, and should, make room for science.

Analysis and Commentary

Drug Reciprocity Could Save Lives In The U.S.

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia City Journal
Tuesday, July 31, 2018
President Trump recently signed legislation permitting terminally ill patients to obtain experimental drugs directly from manufacturers, without having to wait for full approval.
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Regulatory Dark Matter

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, July 19, 2018

Executive branch agencies like the FDA are abusing their power by issuing excessive rules and guidelines.

Analysis and Commentary

Why Not Genetically Engineered Organic Foods?

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Washington Examiner
Sunday, June 3, 2018

USDA’s arbitrary rules about what is permitted for the “organic” designation prohibit important advances in agriculture and food production, and they unnecessarily restrict consumer choice. That could be remedied by expanding what is permitted under the federal National Organic Standards, and this would be an opportune time.

Analysis and Commentary

Perspective: FDA Overreach On Genetically Engineered Animals

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Issues in Science and Technology
Friday, June 1, 2018
The oft-quoted quip "To a man with a hammer, everything looks like a nail" anticipated the practice of federal agencies expanding their mandate by shoehorning policy initiatives into regulatory regimes for which they were never intended.
Analysis and Commentary

Trump's New Prescription Drug Plan Is Incomplete -- Here Are Two Ways To Make It Better

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Fox News
Monday, May 14, 2018

On Friday President Trump in the White House Rose Garden briefly outlined the four key aspirational strategies of his "blueprint to lower drug prices": "improved competition, better negotiation, incentives for lower list prices, and lowering out-of-pocket costs."

Analysis and Commentary

To Solve Drug Prices, We Need More Competition, Not More Government Meddling

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Washington Examiner
Friday, May 11, 2018
President Trump has often criticized what he considers to be excessively high drug prices, castigating drug companies and accusing them of “getting away with murder.” He was scheduled to give a major speech on April 26 about initiatives intended to lower prescription drug prices, but it has been postponed until today.
Analysis and Commentary

Viewpoint: How Politics Pollutes The FDA's Genetically Modified Animal Regulations And Stifles Innovation

by Henry I. Miller, John Cohrssenvia Genetic Literacy Project
Friday, March 30, 2018

Dogs bark, cows moo, and regulators regulate,” former U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner Frank Young once quipped to explain regulatory agencies’ expansionist tendencies. There may be no better example than the FDA’s oversight of genetically engineered animals.

Analysis and Commentary

How The FDA Virtually Destroyed An Entire Sector Of Biotechnology

by John Cohrssen, Henry I. Millervia Regulation (Cato Institute)
Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Dogs bark, cows moo, and regulators regulate,” former U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner Frank Young once quipped to explain regulatory agencies’ expansionist tendencies. There may be no better example than the FDA’s oversight of genetically engineered animals.

Analysis and Commentary

Solve US Drug Shortages With Imported Medicine That Measures Up To FDA Standards

by John Cohrssen, Henry I. Millervia The Hill
Thursday, November 30, 2017

Occasionally we encounter a simple tweak in public policy that would be a win-win -— if it weren’t for politicians, bureaucrats and stakeholders zealously guarding their self-interest. An example is a reform that would both help combat shortages of critical drugs and put downward pressure on prices: reciprocity of drug approvals between FDA and certain foreign counterparts.

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