Mark Moyar

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Trump’s History Conference

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, September 23, 2020

President Trump’s remarks about the need to “restore patriotic education” at the White House Conference on American History have provoked a flurry of defenses and counterattacks from academic historians. The defenders dispute the notion that their teaching undermines patriotism, contending that any criticisms they might make of the United States are intended to improve the United States, not destroy it. The counterattackers denounce the President for threatening their academic freedom and advancing a version of history that ignores racism and pays too much attention to dead white males.

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The Military-Industrial Complex

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Thursday, September 17, 2020

President Donald Trump’s recent warning about the influence of the defense industry has sparked comparisons to Dwight Eisenhower’s assertion that “we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex.” When Eisenhower spoke those words in his 1961 farewell address, he believed that the massive growth of America’s peacetime armed forces had given them and the defense industry enough power that they could “endanger our liberties or democratic processes.”

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Supporting Our Troops?

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Jeffrey Goldberg’s allegation that President Trump derided American troops has injected much-needed adrenaline into Joe Biden’s supporters. The unwillingness of Goldberg’s sources to identify themselves and the holes poked in the story by named witnesses have done little to stem the flood of articles and Tweets characterizing the episode as the latest proof of Trump’s depravity. The badmouthing of the military is said to be a “new low.”

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The Army Marches Into The Future

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Thursday, September 3, 2020

During a public speech last week, Army Chief of Staff General James C. McConville called for rapid transformation of the U.S. Army to deal with new domains of warfare, particularly the electronic, cyberspace, and space domains. The Army has been seeking to adapt to “multi-domain operations” for several years, but McConville and others are dissatisfied with the rate of progress. With the outbreak of war possible at any time, they argue, the transformation has to take place at breakneck pace.

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Competition in the Mediterranean

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Friday, January 10, 2020

During the Cold War, and for more than two decades after the Cold War, the United States was the dominant power in the Mediterranean. Barack Obama’s reduction of the U.S. military presence in the Mediterranean and the ensuing Russian intervention in Syria in 2015 allowed Russia to gain in influence at the expense of the United States. 

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U.S. Aid to Afghanistan Remains Critical

by Mark Moyarvia Strategika
Monday, February 26, 2018

Abandonment of Afghanistan at this time would be highly inadvisable because of the inordinate risks of abetting Islamic extremism and generating higher outflows of narcotics and people. The strategy of 2013-2017, in which small numbers of American troops advised Afghan forces and conducted raids, prevented the Kabul government from falling, but it failed to prevent insurgents from retaking much of the country. Military setbacks heightened infighting among Afghan elites and impeded the development of a viable national government.

Analysis and Commentary

Tet In Retrospect

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 30, 2018

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive. During the Tet holiday ceasefire, Vietnamese Communist forces attacked all of South Vietnam’s towns and cities in order to smash South Vietnamese government forces and incite popular uprisings. Many of the government’s soldiers and policemen were off duty during the holiday, enabling the Communists to infiltrate the towns and cities undetected and strike the first blows. But government forces rallied quickly, and everywhere the population rejected Communist appeals to take part in the uprising. 

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Network Concerns

by Mark Moyar featuring Niall Fergusonvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

The publication this month of Niall Ferguson’s new book The Square and the Tower has illuminated both the power of networks and the human tendency to overstate the power of networks. For longer than one might expect, tech enthusiasts, corporate executives, social scientists, and military theorists have proclaimed that networks will revolutionize some, if not all, aspects of human existence, generally for the better. As Ferguson’s book explains in devastating detail, their lofty visions have been repeatedly confounded by reality.

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The Legacy Of Operation Desert Storm

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, January 16, 2018

On January 16, 1991, President George H. W. Bush announced the start of armed hostilities with Iraq. Operation Desert Storm, as the Americans called the offensive, followed the five months of Operation Desert Shield, during which American and allied forces from around the world had sailed to the Persian Gulf to evict Iraqi forces from Kuwait.

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Wilson’s Fourteen Points

by Mark Moyarvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, January 10, 2018

One hundred years ago this week, Woodrow Wilson delivered his Fourteen Points address to a joint session of Congress.

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