Expertise: 

Michael J. Petrilli

Visiting Fellow
Biography: 

Mike Petrilli is an award-winning writer and president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, one of the country’s most influential education policy think tanks. He is the author of The Diverse Schools’ Dilemma: A Parent's Guide to Socioeconomically Mixed Public Schools and coeditor of Knowledge at the Core: Don Hirsch, Core Knowledge, and the Future of the Common Core. Petrilli is also a visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution and executive editor of Education Next. Petrilli has published opinion pieces in the New York Times, Washington Post Bloomberg View, Slate, and Wall Street Journal and has been a guest on NBC Nightly News,, ABC World News Tonight, CNN, and Fox, as well as several National Public Radio programs, including All Things Considered, On Point, and the Diane Rehm Show. Petrilli helped create the US Department of Education’s Office of Innovation and Improvement, the Policy Innovators in Education Network, and Young Education Professionals. He lives with his family in Bethesda, Maryland.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

How Charter Supporters Can Win Over Joe Biden

by Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Thursday, October 22, 2020

On paper, it seems like Joe Biden would champion the cause of expanding high-quality charter schools. He’s a longtime centrist Democrat, and centrist Democrats usually love charter schools, going back to Bill Clinton. He was Barack Obama’s vice president, and Obama has long loved charter schools. Biden was brought back from political near-death thanks to the support of Black voters, and Black voters love charter schools. 

Interviews

Chester Finn And Michael Petrilli On The Education Gadfly Show: The Loathsome War On Exam Schools

interview with Chester E. Finn Jr., Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly
Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Hoover Institution fellows Checker Finn and Michael Petrilli discuss the growing, misguided war on selective-admissions high schools.

In the News

Election To Bring Major Changes To Senate Education Committee, With Early Childhood Champion Patty Murray Likely To Lead If Democrats Prevail

quoting Michael J. Petrillivia The 74 Million
Monday, October 19, 2020

With several close races offering Democrats the chance to take control of the Senate and Sen. Lamar Alexander’s upcoming retirement after five years as chair of the education committee, it’s clear federal education policy will take a turn next year. The question is where.

Featured

The Case For Urban Charter Schools

by David Griffith, Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Contrary to much public rhetoric, the evidence for expanding charter schools in urban areas is stronger than ever. To be sure, the research is less positive for charters operating outside of the nation’s urban centers. And multiple studies suggest that internet-based schools and charters that serve mostly middle-class students, perform worse than their district counterparts, at least on traditional test-score-based measures.

Interviews

Michael Petrilli: The Education Gadfly Show: Reading Comprehension Is Not A Skill, And Other Lessons From Fordham’s Latest Study

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly (Thomas B. Fordham Institute)
Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses the following research, “Social Studies Instruction and Reading Comprehension: Evidence from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study.”

Interviews

Michael Petrilli: The Education Gadfly Show: How To Open A School Safely During A Pandemic

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly (Thomas B. Fordham Institute)
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses the Brooklyn Laboratory Charter Schools’s innovative reopening recommendations.

Analysis and Commentary

Elementary Schools: To Improve Reading Comprehension, Teach More Social Studies

by Amber M. Northern, Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

If America is serious about wanting kids to become better readers, our elementary schools need to spend more time teaching social studies rather than doubling-down on “reading comprehension.” This may seem counterintuitive, but it’s the key takeaway from a groundbreaking study the Thomas B. Fordham Institute released last week.

Interviews

Michael Petrilli: The Education Gadfly Show: How The Pandemic Could Lead To Smarter School Spending

interview with Michael J. Petrillivia Education Gadfly (Thomas B. Fordham Institute)
Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Michael Petrilli discusses Rick Hess’s and Brandon Wright's newly edited volume, Getting the Most Bang for the Education Buck.

Analysis and Commentary

A Commission On Teaching American History Might Do Some Good

by Michael J. Petrillivia Flypaper (Fordham Education Blog)
Wednesday, September 23, 2020

President Trump caused a stir last week when he celebrated Constitution Day by attacking the “radicals” who “want to burn down the principles enshrined in our founding documents” and calling for a 1776 Commission. It echoed his comments from the Fourth of July, when he warned that “our children are taught in school to hate their own country, and to believe that the men and women who built it were not heroes, but that they were villains.”

Featured

The Case For Urban Charter Schooling

by David Griffith, Michael J. Petrillivia National Affairs
Wednesday, September 23, 2020

A decade ago, the charter-school movement was moving from strength to strength. As student enrollment surged and new schools opened in cities across the country, America's first black president provided much-needed political cover from teachers' union attacks. Yet today, with public support fading and enrollment stalling nationwide — and with Democratic politicians from Elizabeth Warren to Joe Biden disregarding, downplaying, or publicly disavowing the charter movement — the situation for America's charter schools has become virtually unrecognizable.

Pages