Steven Hayward

Steven Hayward

Biography: 

Steven F. Hayward is a fellow at both the American Enterprise Institute and the Pacific Research Institute. He is the author of The Age of Reagan, 1964-1980: The Fall of the Old Liberal Order and The Age of Reagan: The Conservative Counterrevolution: 1980-1989as well as the annual Index of Leading Environmental Indicators.

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What Bill O’Reilly’s New Book On Ronald Reagan Gets Wrong About Ronald Reagan

by Craig Shirley, Kiron K. Skinner, Paul Kengor, Steven Haywardvia The Washington Post
Friday, October 16, 2015

Bad sources and old misconceptions persist in "Killing Reagan."

Analysis and Commentary

What ‘The Butler’ Gets Wrong About Ronald Reagan and Race

by Kiron K. Skinner, Steven Hayward, Paul Kengorvia Washington Post
Thursday, August 29, 2013

Four presidential historians say the film gets it wrong.

Steven Hayward

The Age of Reagan with Steven Hayward

by Peter M. Robinsonwith Steven Haywardvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, September 21, 2009

Discussing his new book, The Age of Reagan: The Conservative Counterrevolution, Hayward asserts that Ronald Reagan was one of the most consequential presidents in American history.

In the News

Reagan with Steven Hayward: Chapter 3 of 5

by Steven Haywardvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Steven Hayward outlines Reagan’s domestic policy, for a time known as Reaganomics...

Steven Hayward

The Environment with Steven Hayward

by Peter M. Robinsonwith Steven Haywardvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, May 11, 2009

Hayward challenges the established narrative of environmentalism, beginning with the notion that the earth is fragile and that we have little time to save it from environmental catastrophe. He deconstructs the case for global warming (including “cap and trade” plans to limit greenhouse gas emissions and the new EPA “endangerment finding” on CO2 ) and speaks to the challenges faced by poor countries as they seek to modernize and at the same time reduce the pollution that has historically accompanied modernization. Finally, he offers his insights into the deep structure of environmentalism that substitutes a human apocalypse for a religious one. (34:41) Video transcript

TIME HAS COME TODAY: Global Population and Consumption

with Paul Ehrlich, Steven Haywardvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, July 28, 2004

In 1990 the United Nations forecast that world population would peak at around 11 billion by the middle of this century. Now many experts believe the peak will be closer to 8 or 9 billion people. Is this slowing of global population growth good news for the earth's environment? Or do we still need to worry about the dangers of overpopulation and overconsumption? Peter Robinson speaks with Paul Ehrlich and Steven Hayward.

THE FIGHT ON THE RIGHT: Neoconservatives versus Paleoconservatives

with Steven Hayward, John Theodoracopulosvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, May 16, 2003

Conservative: favoring traditional views and values; tending to oppose change. But is the definition of a conservative changing in twentieth-century America? Today conservatives seem to be divided into two groups, the neoconservatives and those who view themselves as traditional conservatives—sometimes derisively called the "paleoconservatives." Are the neoconservatives, including many in the Bush administration, actually, as some charge, radicals in conservative clothing? Or have the paleoconservatives become too hidebound for their own good?

A Question of Capacity

by Steven Haywardvia Policy Review
Friday, January 1, 1999

How many children can vouchers really help?

SLASHING THROUGH THE REGULATION THICKET

by Steven Haywardvia Policy Review
Sunday, November 1, 1998

Steve Hayward on cities that are slashing through the regulation thicket Merrill Matthews Jr. on bringing freedom of choice to public housing The State of the States

Legends of the Sprawl

by Steven Haywardvia Policy Review
Tuesday, September 1, 1998

Liberals have a new scapegoat for their urban failures: suburban growth

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