Tunku Varadarajan is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution

Tunku Varadarajan

Biography: 

Tunku Varadarajan is the Hoover Institution's institutional editor and editor-in-chief of Hoover’s in-house publication Defining Ideas. A writer-at-large at the Daily Beast, he was a former editor of Newsweek and Newsweek International. Previously, he was executive editor (opinions) at Forbes, assistant managing editor and op-ed editor of the Wall Street Journal, and the New York bureau chief for The Times (of London). Born in India, he is a British citizen. A visiting scholar at New York University's Department of Journalism, he is a former lecturer in law at Trinity College, Oxford. He has also taught at NYU's Stern School of Business, the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University, and the City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism. Varadarajan has a BA in law, with honors, from Oxford University.

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Once More To Ground Zero

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, June 17, 2019

There was laughter, merriment, even some horseplay. I noticed it not because it was loud, but because of where it was happening, 40 feet from one of the two memorial pools at ground zero in lower Manhattan.

Analysis and Commentary

India Turns West But Away From Western Values

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Thursday, May 23, 2019

[Subscription Required] Aparadox is playing out in India. The country is abandoning Western values at a time when it is closer strategically to the West, and to the U.S. in particular, than it has ever been.

Analysis and Commentary

When Reagan Went To China

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, April 29, 2019

I recently suggested to a still-sprightly friend who worked in the Reagan White House that President Reagan’s address at Fudan University in Shanghai—delivered April 30, 1984—was a terrific speech that stands forgotten. My friend texted a pensive reply. “If not largely forgotten, then it’s at least overshadowed by subsequent oratory in a busy rhetorical era.”

Interviews

Tunku Varadarajan: ISIS Attacks Peaceful Sri Lanka & What Is To Be Done?

interview with Tunku Varadarajanvia The John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Tunku Varadarajan discusses his Wall Street Journal article "Behind the Easter Sunday Attacks in Sri Lanka."

Analysis and Commentary

Behind The Easter Sunday Attacks In Sri Lanka

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, April 22, 2019

The island is no stranger to terrorism, but the violence has usually been between Buddhists and Hindus.

Analysis and Commentary

A Private Jet May Break The Sound Barrier

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, April 12, 2019

The Concorde last flew in 2003. Aerion CEO Tom Vice plans a new 12-seat plane that can travel at Mach 1.4.

Analysis and Commentary

America’s Great Immigration System

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, March 8, 2019
‘The comic thing about this drama is that no one is even pretending there is a real emergency.” So says Neeraj Kaushal, 57, a professor of social policy at Columbia who has just published a bracing book on U.S. immigration policy. Her thesis: Far from presenting an emergency, as President Trump contends, America’s immigration system is the best in the world.
Analysis and Commentary

The French Philosopher Who Loves America

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, February 8, 2019

Bernard-Henri Lévy describes the gilets jaunes as a ‘crisis of liberal democracy’ and Trump as an ‘epiphenomenon’ of American ‘retreat.’

Analysis and Commentary

A Parkland Father’s Quest For Accountability

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, January 11, 2019

In a campground near Lake Kissimmee, Andrew Pollack and I sit in the shadow of a white RV, his spartan home. He broods by my side in cargo shorts and a T-shirt. He’s just sold his large house in Coral Springs, Fla., because he feels “physically sick to be in Broward County,” where his 18-year-old daughter was shot dead last Valentine’s Day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas School in Parkland. He’s lived in his RV for nearly three weeks with his wife and their Belgian Malinois puppy, who isn’t yet at ease with life in a mobile home. A campfire burns skittishly in the lakeside wind, its blaze nothing compared with Mr. Pollack’s burning rage.

Analysis and Commentary

‘Unruly Waters’ And ‘Ganges’ Review: In India, Water Is Politics

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, January 4, 2019

The opening shot of “Mother India,” the most iconic film made in India in the decade after its independence, is of an old peasant woman struggling to grow crops on parched land. Behind her are rumbling tractors and earth movers, unsubtle symbols of progress. Then the camera pans past electric cables and newly metaled roads to a magnificent dam, which will bring water to the arid earth. 

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