Tunku Varadarajan is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution

Tunku Varadarajan

Biography: 

Tunku Varadarajan is the Hoover Institution's institutional editor and editor-in-chief of Hoover’s in-house publication Defining Ideas. A writer-at-large at the Daily Beast, he was a former editor of Newsweek and Newsweek International. Previously, he was executive editor (opinions) at Forbes, assistant managing editor and op-ed editor of the Wall Street Journal, and the New York bureau chief for The Times (of London). Born in India, he is a British citizen. A visiting scholar at New York University's Department of Journalism, he is a former lecturer in law at Trinity College, Oxford. He has also taught at NYU's Stern School of Business, the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University, and the City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism. Varadarajan has a BA in law, with honors, from Oxford University.

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Recent Commentary

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Putting Tolerance to the Test

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

At its founding, India displayed a powerful affinity for Western values—equality, self-rule, dignity. But in the name of Hindu tradition, the country’s present rulers are flouting those values.

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Elegy in an English Church

by Tunku Varadarajanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, October 9, 2019

One quietly proud corner of Britain sees Brexit as a matter of what to keep, not whom to exclude.

Interviews

Tunku Varadarajan: How Mexicans See The U.S. And Trump

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, September 27, 2019

The border fence is ‘a visible example of national paranoia,’ author Paul Theroux says. Yet he thinks Americans are right to be afraid.

Analysis and Commentary

‘The Only Plane In The Sky’ And ‘Fall And Rise’ Review: Out Of The Blue On Sept. 11

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, September 6, 2019
A remembrance of beauty persists alongside the horrors that mark Sept. 11, 2001. A storm had swept across the Northeast the day before, giving rise that morning to a rare meteorological phenomenon known as “severe clear.”
Analysis and Commentary

A Feminist Capitalist Professor Under Fire

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, August 30, 2019

The students who demand her firing, Camille Paglia argues, take prosperity for granted, are socially undeveloped, and know little about Western history. Who’s Moses?

Analysis and Commentary

Why The EU Lost Middle England

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, July 22, 2019

Brexit isn’t rooted in ‘emotion’ but in a quiet sense of civilization evident in a village church.

Analysis and Commentary

‘Giants of the Monsoon Forest’ Review: The Indispensable Pachyderm

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, July 5, 2019

Elephants bring dexterity, intelligence and determination to the work of transporting goods and people in places motor vehicles can’t travel.

Analysis and Commentary

Trump, The Fed, And Interest Rates

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, June 28, 2019

These are dizzy days for monetary economists. Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank, gave notice in a June 18 policy speech that his beleaguered shop could cut interest rates even further than it has already if Europe’s economy continues to deteriorate.

Analysis and Commentary

Once More To Ground Zero

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Monday, June 17, 2019

There was laughter, merriment, even some horseplay. I noticed it not because it was loud, but because of where it was happening, 40 feet from one of the two memorial pools at ground zero in lower Manhattan.

Analysis and Commentary

India Turns West But Away From Western Values

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Thursday, May 23, 2019

[Subscription Required] Aparadox is playing out in India. The country is abandoning Western values at a time when it is closer strategically to the West, and to the U.S. in particular, than it has ever been.

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