Tunku Varadarajan is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution

Tunku Varadarajan

Biography: 

Tunku Varadarajan is the Hoover Institution's institutional editor and editor-in-chief of Hoover’s in-house publication Defining Ideas. A writer-at-large at the Daily Beast, he was a former editor of Newsweek and Newsweek International. Previously, he was executive editor (opinions) at Forbes, assistant managing editor and op-ed editor of the Wall Street Journal, and the New York bureau chief for The Times (of London). Born in India, he is a British citizen. A visiting scholar at New York University's Department of Journalism, he is a former lecturer in law at Trinity College, Oxford. He has also taught at NYU's Stern School of Business, the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University, and the City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism. Varadarajan has a BA in law, with honors, from Oxford University.

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Recent Commentary

Interviews

‘Living His Mother’s American Dream’

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, June 19, 2020

Sen. Tim Scott discusses his police-reform bill, Dick Durbin’s put-down, and how Republicans can appeal to black voters.

All Hail The Return Of TV Sports

by Tunku Varadarajan
Wednesday, June 17, 2020

European soccer and Saturday’s Belmont Stakes are welcome distractions from Covid gloom.

Analysis and Commentary

‘A People Betrayed’ Review: Robbery Under Law

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, June 12, 2020
‘This book makes no attempt to suggest that Spain is unique in terms of corruption or governmental incompetence,” writes Paul Preston early in “A People Betrayed.”
Analysis and Commentary

A Veteran’s View Of American Policing

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, June 12, 2020

New York’s longest serving police commissioner on George Floyd, how the NYPD made racial progress, and good and bad reform proposals.

Analysis and Commentary

‘Indian Sun’ Review: The Virtuoso Becomes A Celebrity

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, May 29, 2020

If Mahatma Gandhi is unarguably the Indian most famed in the world in the past 100 years, there can be little doubt that the musician Ravi Shankar is next in the pecking order of renown. Unlike the celibate Mahatma, however—whose idea of pleasure was a mouthful of goat’s milk—the sitar maestro was a charismatic sensualist whose girlfriends “numbered 186 in all.”

Interviews

Tunku Varadarajan On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Tunku Varadarajanvia The John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Hoover Institution fellow Tunku Varadarajan discusses his Wall Street Journal article "Searching on Foot for My White Whale."

 
Analysis and Commentary

Searching On Foot For My White Whale

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Washington Post
Sunday, May 17, 2020

Even amid lockdown, an empty Brooklyn street proves to be an elusive quarry.

Analysis and Commentary

‘Naoroji: Pioneer Of Indian Nationalism’ Review: Portrait Of An Independent Mind

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Saturday, May 9, 2020

A member of the British House of Commons at a time when Indians in India couldn’t vote, he argued that the empire was impoverishing his homeland.

Analysis and Commentary

‘Naoroji: Pioneer Of Indian Nationalism’ Review: Portrait Of An Independent Mind

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, May 8, 2020
When the British government announced in 2014 that it would install a statue of Mohandas Gandhi in London’s Parliament Square, there were complaints in certain quarters that the wrong anticolonial Indian was being honored in the heart of an erstwhile empire. The statue, some said, should be not of the Mahatma—however great his status as tormentor-in-chief of the British Raj—but of Dadabhai Naoroji.
Interviews

An Industry Both Grounded And Up In The Air

by Tunku Varadarajanvia The Wall Street Journal
Friday, May 8, 2020

Joel Peterson and Robin Hayes, JetBlue’s chairman and CEO, on how the pandemic has racked the business and how flying will be different once it’s over.

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