Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-four books, the latest of which is The Case for Trump (Basic Books, 2019). His other books include The Second World Wars (Basic Books, 2017); The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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Recent Commentary

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson On The John Batchelor Show

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The John Batchelor Show
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses his National Review article "How Robert O’Rourke Became ‘Beto’."

Featured

The German–Soviet Non-Aggression Pact: A Bad Deal, 80 Years Ago

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, August 15, 2019

The Hitler–Stalin alliance upset the balance of power and undermined military deterrence. The rest is history.

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson: Democrats Won’t Condemn ICE Facility Shootings Because They Could ‘Spike Illegal Immigration Up’

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia Daily Caller
Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson discusses the attacks on ICE facilities.

In the News

California Bans Workplace, School Rules About Curly Hair

mentioning Victor Davis Hansonvia The Federalist
Wednesday, August 14, 2019

California recently passed the CROWN Act (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair). Under CROWN, employers and public schools may not ban “natural” hairstyles historically associated with black culture, such as braids, locks, and twists. To justify the need for CROWN, the preamble claims American history is “riddled” with laws and societal norms that have denigrated blackness and associated racial traits such as “kinky and curly hair.”

In the News

The Weirdness Of Lefty Tough Guys

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia Richard Viguerie's Conservative HQ
Wednesday, August 14, 2019

One of the truly weird features of the modern Left, especially its major political candidates and media figures, is the propensity to engage in the politics of personal confrontation and physical threats against President Trump, his supporters and others on the Right. As Victor Davis Hanson wrote in a recent column for FOX News, former Vice President Joe Biden has bragged on two occasions that he would like to beat up President Trump.

Analysis and Commentary

How Robert O’Rourke Became ‘Beto’

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Monday, August 12, 2019

It seems that being thought Hispanic is an advantage, not a disadvantage.

Featured

The Strange Case Of ‘White Supremacy’

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Sunday, August 11, 2019

Any majority population must be careful not to revert to pre-civilized tribalism and oppressing minority groups. The United States, like every other country that enjoys diverse populations has struggled from its beginning to ensure equality, sometimes unsuccessfully, and only at the cost of thousands of lives.

Featured

Why Target Tucker Carlson? It's Part Of The Left's War On The Right

by Victor Davis Hansonvia The Hill
Friday, August 9, 2019

The mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, have rightly shocked the nation. In our understandable collective furor over the senseless loss of life, all the old political divides are being revisited, now in a climate of often frightening blame, anger and distrust — from gun control to the role of extremist ideologies to mental health to responsibilities of political leaders not to inflame tensions

Analysis and Commentary

Will 2020 Be A Repeat Of 2004 For Democrats?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, August 8, 2019

Fifteen years ago, the Democrats backed off from the hard left, taking the safe route in nominating a boring and sedate party man — and came close to winning against a controversial incumbent president.

Analysis and Commentary

Democrats’ Debate Cowardice, Hypocrisy, And Nuttiness

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Half of the Democratic 20-person primary field in the debates appeared unhappy, shrill, and self-righteous, and determined that no candidate should out-left any other.

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