Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-three books, the latest of which is The Second World Wars (Basic Books), which was released in October 2017. His other books include The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Five Catastrophic Decisions

by Victor Davis Hansonvia The Corner (National Review Online)
Tuesday, April 10, 2018

1) The Obama administration’s invitation to Vladimir Putin to come into Syria ostensibly to stop the use of weapons of mass destruction. The latter did not happen, but after an over 40-year Russian hiatus in the Middle East, Putin has recalibrated the region, and Russia will be far harder to expel than it was to invite in. John Kerry did not get rid of WMD; he ensured that he got more of it.

Featured

The Ideology Of Illegal Immigration

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Gang members next door and dead dogs dumped in your yard? Don’t complain, or you’ll be called racist.

Featured

The Limits Of American Patience

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Monday, April 9, 2018

Not being willing any longer to be manipulated is not succumbing to isolationism. Wondering whether the United States can afford another liability is not mindless nationalism. Questioning whether America can afford the status quo here and abroad is not heresy. Assuming we can borrow our way out of any inconvenience is largely over.

Featured

Trump Is Cutting Old Gordian Knots

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, April 5, 2018

Donald Trump’s unconventional methods may be exactly what is required for seemingly unsolvable problems.

Analysis and Commentary

A Response To Kevin Williamson

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, April 5, 2018
In the past, I have often enjoyed Kevin Williamson’s essays. Even when I found them occasionally incoherent and cruel, I thought it hardly my business to object to a colleague’s writing. But I gather, under changed circumstances, such deference no longer applies, given that in Williamson’s very first column at The Atlantic he attacks both me, and in a backhanded way, his former employer National Review for publishing a recent article I wrote.
Analysis and Commentary

The New Last Refuge Of Scoundrels

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, April 3, 2018

If you’re PC, it’s apparently okay to use homophobic slurs and sexually assault your employees.

Featured

Washington’s Fantasies Are Not People’s Reality

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Friday, March 30, 2018

The Beltway’s sober and judicious foreign-policy establishment laments Donald Trump’s purported dismantling of the postwar order. They apparently take the president’s words as deeds and their own innate dislike of him as disinterested analysis.

Featured

Our Unelected Officials’ Distortions

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, March 29, 2018
Why haven’t we held career government servants in the intelligence community and the Department of Justice accountable for their fabrications?
Featured

Where Are The Left’s Modern Muckrakers?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, March 27, 2018

High-tech corporations have acquired massive power and wealth, dwarfing the might of the robber barons of the past.

Victor David Hanson
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Victor Davis Hanson, Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow on Trump’s Agenda—One Year Later

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Thursday, March 22, 2018

Victor Davis Hanson, chair of Hoover’s Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict, looks back at the first year of the Trump presidency—including the president’s foreign and domestic policy actions, his supporters and critics, and his unique style of leadership. 

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