Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-three books, the latest of which is The Second World Wars (Basic Books), which was released in October 2017. His other books include The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Relearning important lessons on terrorism

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Friday, August 25, 2006

What old lessons about terrorism are we in the West finding ourselves having to relearn...

Analysis and Commentary

Mr. Bush’s Communication Problem

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Thursday, August 24, 2006

Just when former supporters of the Iraq invasion and the wider so-called war against terror are proclaiming doom and gloom, other commentators conclude that we have already defeated the jihadists! Nostalgia even abounds about returning to the 1990s, when the United States occasionally swatted bothersome terrorists with cruise missiles and indictments...

Analysis and Commentary

Hope Amid Despair?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Friday, August 18, 2006

Pessimism is now the conventional wisdom about the wars in the Middle East, and, indeed, it is hard to find any good news in the recent ceasefire…

Analysis and Commentary

Islamist anger against U.S. based on misperceptions

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Friday, August 18, 2006

What makes two dozen British Muslims want to blow up thousands of innocent passengers on jumbo jets…

Analysis and Commentary

Why no outrage?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Sunday, August 13, 2006

When I used to read about the 1930s - the Italian invasion of Abyssinia; the rise of fascism in Italy, Spain and Germany; the appeasement in France and Britain; the murderous duplicity of the Soviet Union; and the racist Japanese murdering in China - I never could quite figure out why, during those bleak years, western Europeans and those in the United States did not speak out and condemn the growing madness, if only to defend the millennia-long promise of Western liberalism…

Analysis and Commentary

Surreal Rules

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Friday, August 11, 2006

Prior to September 11, the general consensus was that conventional Middle East armies were paper tigers and that their terrorist alternatives were best dealt with by bombing them from a distance — as in Lebanon, Afghanistan, Iraq, east Africa, etc. — and then letting them sort out their own rubble…

Analysis and Commentary

America loves a cowboy

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Sunday, August 6, 2006

The end of cowboy diplomacy," Time magazine recently announced of George W. Bush's supposed turn to softer talk and more multilateral policymaking…

Analysis and Commentary

The Brink of Madness

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Friday, August 4, 2006

When I used to read about the 1930s — the Italian invasion of Abyssinia, the rise of fascism in Italy, Spain, and Germany, the appeasement in France and Britain, the murderous duplicity of the Soviet Union, and the racist Japanese murdering in China — I never could quite figure out why, during those bleak years, Western Europeans and those in the United States did not speak out and condemn the growing madness, if only to defend the millennia-long promise of Western liberalism…

Analysis and Commentary

Playing the role of victim keeps Mideast in crisis

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Thursday, August 3, 2006

Despite the claims of terrorist organizations, Israel's current two-front war is not just about land…

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Break the Habit

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Sunday, July 30, 2006

Each year, mexicans working in the United States send billions in hard currency back home—an injection to which the Mexican economy has grown addicted. We need to help the junkie break the habit. By Victor Davis Hanson.

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