Williamson Murray

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The Crucial Importance of Taiwan

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

There appear real moral reasons why the United States should do everything it can to protect the independent state of Taiwan diplomatically, politically, and militarily as long as the People’s Republic of China represents a direct threat to American interests directly and globally.

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The Next Great Plague

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, March 30, 2021

During the past year, the globe has gone through a time that to most of its people, at least in the developed world, has appeared to be an entirely new experience. A plague of considerable virulence has rippled across the world and resulted in the deaths of millions as well as untold damage to national economies.

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Thoughts On The Fragility Of Civilization

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Thursday, March 25, 2021

A 2017 Norwegian-Irish film (The King’s Choice) examines the hard choice that the nation’s monarch, Haakon VII, confronted in the dark days that followed the German invasion of his country on April 9, 1940.

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The Assault On Our Past

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, March 16, 2021

The assault on our past continues unabated. In its efforts to further “racial healing” in something called the “historical reckoning project,” the City of Chicago is deciding whether to eliminate some forty plus statues from its environs.

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The Remnants Of The Confederacy

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Perhaps there was nothing more troubling during the dismal events of January 6, 2021 than the picture of the bedraggled individual carrying the battle flag of the Confederacy through the hallowed halls of the Capitol. Only a few days before the Congress of the United States had called for the renaming of U.S. Army forts in the South which carried the names of Confederate generals, a measure that had passed over the veto of President Trump.

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A Critical Moment in U.S.–Russian Relations

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Thursday, January 28, 2021

At present it is extraordinarily difficult to see how any American government—beyond former President Donald J. Trump—would be willing to trust the Russians to the degree necessary to cooperate effectively against the Chinese, at least for the short term

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Strategy And The Continental Commitment

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, April 28, 2020

In the 1930s, the British military pundit B. H. Liddell Hart argued that Britain’s participation in the First World War with a massive commitment to France to fight the Germans had been a terrible mistake. Instead, he argued, Britain, as it had supposedly done in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, should have committed minimal forces to the continent and used its army and navy to attack Germany on the periphery. Liddell Hart’s arguments represented a rephrasing of the “blue water” school in British strategic thinking which had argued that Britain should focus almost entirely on the Royal Navy to the exclusion of spending any resources or committing any troops on the European Continent.

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On Plagues and Their Long-term Effects

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, April 24, 2020

One of the most impressive sections of Thucydides’s timeless account is that of the plague that devastated Athens in the second year of the Peloponnesian War that had begun in 431 BC. He provides us with a clinical description of the disease and its progress, which my medical friends have assured me no modern physician could improve on. Not surprisingly, “the doctors were quite incapable of treating the disease because of their ignorance of the right methods.” 

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How To Explain The Western Way Of War

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, April 21, 2020

At the start of the sixteenth century, Europe appeared the least impressive of the global civilizations, certainly the least likely to achieve a dominant position in the world. Europe was little more than a conglomeration of small, nasty states and cities, sharing a common religion and a common, ferocious desire to fight each other. Moreover, that common religion was about to be shattered by the Reformation. 

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History: Our Own Past

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, April 17, 2020

When we think of history, we tend to think of the dim past before our memories. Thus, it is a knowledge acquired from history books, documents, archeology, inscriptions, and a myriad of other sources. There is, however, another history and that is our own past: the details and memories that we have picked up as we have aged over the years. Those that we have acquired from our earliest years are episodic and lack a clarity that incidents in our more recent days possess. Nevertheless, such early memories can be of use in understanding the present.

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