Williamson Murray

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A New Space Service! Hurrah!!

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Monday, October 15, 2018

The talk among some commentators on America’s defense, furthered by the comments of the president of the United States, is that America needs a new military service, entirely devoted to wartime and peaceful operations in space. It is a brilliant idea which possesses all sorts of possibilities. What a wonderful opportunity this would present in a time in which entitlements are increasingly siphoning funds away from other federal expenditures. A whole new service, my goodness, the opportunities seem extraordinary!

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The Future of War

by Williamson Murrayvia Hoover Digest
Monday, July 9, 2018

Of course we need high-tech weapons. But with great capabilities come great vulnerabilities.

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Repeating The Past

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Monday, April 30, 2018

The United States appears to be slowly emerging out of the wreckage that it has made of the Middle East. One would hope that the country’s political, intellectual, and military leaders would use the coming years to think seriously about the lessons to be learned from a lack of understanding that has marked America’s strategy over the past half century. It would be nice if they would, but I doubt they will. They certainly will not, if the past is any guide. 

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Sacrifice In War

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, April 27, 2018

Seventy-five years ago, over the period from March through early July 1943, the RAF’s Bomber Command was waging what was called at the time, the Battle of the Ruhr. In our own time, only a few antiquarian military historians—a rapidly disappearing breed—would recognize the importance of that battle. Certainly, none of those social historians who today inhabit the halls of academia would have any comments except to condemn the merciless slaughter of “innocent” German civilians by what was part and parcel of the Anglo-American Combined Bomber Offensive. 

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Churchill’s Heroic Leadership

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Two films graced the cinemas of the United States—and Europe—this past year that are worth noting for the light they shine on the past as well as the current sensibilities of our chattering classes. Both cover the same period: May and the first days of June 1940 when the fate of the world hung in the balance. The first, Dunkirk, supposedly covers the escape of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) from France as German panzer divisions, having broken through the French defenses at Sedan, rolled toward the Channel ports and appeared to be on the brink of cutting off and destroying the BEF before it could escape. 

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Time To Celebrate Munich

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Monday, April 9, 2018

And so here we are with the eightieth anniversary of the Munich agreement to look forward to this coming September. Of course, it represents the best in the great liberal tradition that one can find a reasonable solution to any major international dispute, based on the common threads of humanity and disgust at the myths of military preparedness. Recognizing that Czechoslovakia was far away and that the country’s geographic position and industrial strength were irrelevant to any serious strategic considerations, Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain signed away its citizens’ freedom. 

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No Shortage of Quagmires

by Williamson Murrayvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

Seizing the military initiative can lead to success, as history confirms, but only if the party that seizes the initiative is fully prepared to exploit it. Few are. 

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Technology And The Future Of War

by Williamson Murrayvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, November 14, 2017

In our time of unconventional conflict and rogue actors, the most advanced countries have the most to lose. 

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Are There Consequences For The All-Volunteer Military?

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

In the summer of 1970 in the immediate aftermath of a disastrous spring of rioting by university students, President Richard Nixon decided that a draft lottery would determine the following year’s call up. To the astonishment of university administrators who believed that the students were deeply motivated by moral concerns, the troubles disappeared in the fall.

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Grant, Sherman, And The American Way Of War

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Russell Weigley, one of America’s leading military historians in the twentieth century, used Sherman’s 1864 scorched-earth March to the Sea that made “Georgia howl,” as an example of the American way of war. While there is some truth in Weigley’s description, he missed another aspect of the framework within which Grant and Sherman broke Confederate resistance and ended the Civil War: namely logistics and the problems that it raised for Union strategists in waging the war.

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