Williamson Murray

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Autobiography & Memoir

Storm of Steel (In Stahlgewittern), by Ernst Jünger (2004)

by Williamson Murrayvia Classics of Military History
Monday, March 7, 2016

In a new, and far better translation by Michael Hofmann, Ernst Jünger’s account of his three years of service on the Western Front in World War I represents one of the great pieces of literature from that conflict.

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Technology And War: The Revolution That Never Arrived

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, October 30, 2015

In the 1990s, as a result of the overwhelming victory that U.S. military forces and those of their allies achieved over Saddam’s army in the war over Kuwait, a number of military pundits argued that a revolution in military affairs had occurred.

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The Ignorance Of Intelligence Agencies

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, October 27, 2015

At the start of the Second World War, Great Britain’s intelligence agencies were anything but impressive. Their analytic capabilities overestimated the Third Reich’s military potential through 1938. And then in 1939, they changed views and failed to see that the Germans were actually making effective preparations to that would enable them to wreck the European balance of power.

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History As Farce: From Napoleon To Maliki

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, October 21, 2015

In describing France’s descent from the great Napoleon Bonaparte to his nephew, who had overthrown the Second Republic and replaced it with a totted up empire, Karl Marx commented that history repeats itself, “the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce.”In describing France’s descent from the great Napoleon Bonaparte to his nephew, who had overthrown the Second Republic and replaced it with a totted up empire, Karl Marx commented that history repeats itself...

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Past And Present Come Together

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, October 16, 2015

Mark Twain is said to have remarked that “history doesn’t repeat itself but it does rhyme.” Perhaps its most consistent rhyme is the failure of politicians and statesmen to recognize real, palpable dangers despite obvious indications that there are states in the external world that have every intention of inflicting harm.

Poster Collection, US 06031, Hoover Institution Archives.
Background EssayAnalysis and Commentary

Political Correctness And The American Military

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Monday, July 27, 2015

One of the major worries that confronts those who study the American military at present is the question as to whether the accommodation of its units to the social and political agendas of a portion of America’s elite might not in the long run damage what has been for the past thirty years the most competent combat organization in the world.

Poster Collection, UK 2771a, Hoover Institution Archives.
Related CommentaryAnalysis and Commentary

Possessing Sea And Land

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Only those who are ignorant of military history and strategy can argue that the changes in technology and the international environment have marginalized conventional capabilities.

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Clausewitz: Dead at Last?

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, April 22, 2015

At a recent meeting of the senior officers of one of the services, an academic expert on terrorism—one of the fashionable topics in Washington these days—announced that in the modern world Clausewitz was irrelevant because he had nothing to say about ISIS or the various other nasty malignancies bothering the international landscape.

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Wars of Religion

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Thursday, April 16, 2015

In his masterful account of the Peloponnesian War, Thucydides lays out the bitter fruit of civil wars within the Greek poleis of his time, particularly in the city state of Corcyra. In words that echo through the centuries, the great Greek historian warned that in such conflicts (3.82), “words, too, had to change their usual meanings...

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The Coming Explosion in the Middle East

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Monday, April 13, 2015

By the end of the sixteenth century Europe had largely recovered from the massive kill off of its population that the Black Death had brought in its wake in the fourteenth century. But by that point, the ability for the continent to feed its growing population was reaching its limit, while the economy was incapable of supporting the increasing numbers of young men.

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