Monday, January 1, 2001

2001 No. 1

The Next Chapter in American Education

by William J. Bennettvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

The politicians all say they’re in favor of education reform—but nothing much seems to happen. Former secretary of education William Bennett lays out what needs to get done.

When Progressiveness Leads to Backwardness

by Amity Shlaesvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

The staggering number of undereducated teenagers graduating from U.S. high schools every year is a national tragedy—and an object lesson in the damage that misguided educational fads can wreak. By Hoover media fellow Amity Shlaes.

Taking on the Unions

by Terry M. Moevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

There is no way around it: reforming our schools means reforming the teachers’ unions. By Hoover fellow Terry M. Moe.

Reflections on the Recent Past: The Framers and Modern-Day Heresies

by Richard F. Staarvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Former independent counsel Kenneth Starr reflects on the lessons to be learned from his investigation of the president.

Where Have All the Governors Gone?

by Bill Whalenvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

You won’t find many calls for bold reform from today’s state capitals, where complacency, risk-aversion, and cutting big checks seem to be the order of the day. By Hoover fellow Bill Whalen.

How Reagan Helped to Build the House of Bush

by Edwin Meese IIIvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

George W. Bush, it seems plausible to argue, wouldn’t have been elected president in 2000 if George H. W. Bush hadn’t been elected president in 1988. And George H. W. Bush wouldn’t have been elected president in 1988 if Ronald Reagan hadn’t invited him to be Reagan’s running mate in 1980. Hoover fellow Edwin Meese III describes how Reagan decided to issue that 1980 invitation–starting the Bushes on their way.

Why the New Populism Won’t Go Away

by Robert Zelnickvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Have we heard the last of Al Gore’s “New Populism”? No such luck. By Hoover media fellow Bob Zelnick.

The Double Bind of Race and Guilt

by Shelby Steelevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

It was not joblessness that bred the black underclass—it was 35 years of counterproductive government programs. By Hoover fellow Shelby Steele.

From Protest to Politics

by Tamar Jacobyvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

A new generation of technocratic black mayors has emerged with a pragmatic, bottom-line approach to governing. Tamar Jacoby hails these new leaders for their commitment to fiscal solvency and building cities that work—for both blacks and whites.

One Nation, Indivisible

by Ward Connerlyvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Affirmative action is a direct threat to the culture of equality that defines the character of the nation. By Ward Connerly.

Tough Justice Is Saving Our Inner Cities

by Gary S. Beckervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

America’s cities are being reborn. Who are the midwives? Cops. By Hoover fellow Gary S. Becker.

No, the Sky Is Not Falling

by Peter W. Hubervia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Naysayers in the environmental movement have convinced much of the public that our environment is on the road to ruin. Peter W. Huber explains why quite the opposite is the case.

Bootleggers, Baptists, and Global Warming

by Bruce Yandlevia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

As the negotiations over the Kyoto Protocol drag on, environmentalists, corporations, and governments are lobbying in backrooms for provisions that will benefit their own interests. Our interests would be best met if the protocol were scrapped altogether. By Bruce Yandle.

The Virtue of Prosperity

by Dinesh D’Souzavia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Is the impact of the new technocapitalist economy a net plus or net minus for society as a whole? Hoover media fellow Dinesh D’Souza on the moral conundrum of success.

The Dawn of the e-Revolution

by Newt Gingrichvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Despite the magnitude of technological change that we have experienced in the last 30 years, Hoover fellow Newt Gingrich argues, the true technological revolution has only just begun.

Secrecy and Security

by Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

When teenagers have proven they can hack into Pentagon computers, how can we ever hope to protect our vital national secrets? Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz outlines a security regime for the information age.

Communism, Democracy, and Golf

by Ken Jowittvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

How should we deal with the reality of a United States that a decade after the fall of the Berlin Wall is the world’s ideological reference, economic innovator, and only global superpower? Hoover fellow Ken Jowitt offers some suggestions.

Debt for Democracy

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

The campaign to convince the international community to write off the debts of the several dozen poorest countries is morally inspiring, politically timely—and terribly misguided. By Hoover fellow Larry Diamond.

Fires of Hatred

by Norman M. Naimarkvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Although the term ethnic cleansing became part of the lexicon only with the Balkan wars of the 1990s, the brutal practices the term describes occurred with numbing frequency during the past century. Hoover fellow Norman M. Naimark on what causes ethnic cleansing—and how it can be stopped.

The Last Revolution

by Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

How—and why—did Slobodan Milosevic finally fall from power? Hoover fellow Timothy Garton Ash offers an eyewitness report.

The Right Way, the Wrong Way, and the Dutch Way

by Melvyn B. Krauss, Lee R. Thomasvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

While most nations in Europe are struggling with sluggish economic growth and high unemployment rates, the Netherlands is booming. Hoover fellow Melvyn Krauss and Lee R. Thomas explain what the rest of Europe can learn from “the Dutch way.”

Before the Fall

by Alberto Diaz-Cayeros, Beatriz Magaloni, Barry R. Weingastvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Despite being corrupt and unpopular, Mexico’s Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) managed to hold onto power for seven decades before opposition candidate Vicente Fox won the presidency last July. How did the PRI manage this feat? Alberto Diaz-Cayeros, Beatriz Magaloni, and Barry R. Weingast explain.

Ronald Reagan’s Best Scene

by Pete Wilsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Ronald Reagan played his best scene not in Hollywood but while in the White House. By Hoover fellow and former governor of California Pete Wilson.

Here’s the Rest of Him

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Nancy Reagan shows us the side of her husband Dutch didn’t. By Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

How FDR Saved Capitalism

by Seymour Martin Lipset, Gary Marksvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

During the economic crisis of the 1930s, many expected a socialist revolution. The revolution never came. Why? The man in the White House co-opted the left. By Hoover fellow Seymour Martin Lipset and Gary Marks.

An Album of Romanian Images from the Hoover Archives

by Laura Cosovanu, Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Images from the Hoover Archives trace the trajectory of Romanian history in the twentieth century. The selection provided here opens a window on a nation in the process of defining itself.

Documenting Romania’s Long Struggle

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Hoover archivist Elena S. Danielson explains how a tenacious man in his seventies provided a remarkable glimpse into a century of Romanian history.

Part 2: An Album of Romanian Images from the Hoover Archives

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Images from the Hoover Archives trace the trajectory of Romanian history in the twentieth century. The selection provided here opens a window on a nation in the process of defining itself. Ion G. Duca, 1879–1933, Romanian Political Leader

Part 3: An Album of Romanian Images from the Hoover Archives

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Images from the Hoover Archives trace the trajectory of Romanian history in the twentieth century. The selection provided here opens a window on a nation in the process of defining itself. Queen Marie of Romania, 1875–1938

Part 4: An Album of Romanian Images from the Hoover Archives

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Images from the Hoover Archives trace the trajectory of Romanian history in the twentieth century. The selection provided here opens a window on a nation in the process of defining itself. King Michael I of Romania

Courtyard of Former Communist Prison of Sighet

Part 5: An Album of Romanian Images from the Hoover Archives

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Images from the Hoover Archives trace the trajectory of Romanian history in the twentieth century. The selection provided here opens a window on a nation in the process of defining itself. The Era of Communist Repression, 1947–1989

Part 6: An Album of Romanian Images from the Hoover Archives

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 2001

Images from the Hoover Archives trace the trajectory of Romanian history in the twentieth century. The selection provided here opens a window on a nation in the process of defining itself. The Fall of Communism