The Twilight of Human Rights?

by Charles Hillvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Today’s deepest challenge to the values of the West comes from China, which is moving to sweep away the very idea of individual rights.

Charles Hill: Grand Strategist

by Harrison Smithvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The late Hoover fellow was a genius at weaving “giant ideas” into analyses of the problems, and the promise, of the world.

Exposing the Kleptocrats

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Ten steps to combat the mega-corruption that saps national wealth and smothers democracy.

Courage, not Cancellation

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Free speech means citizens are willing both to question and to be questioned.

We Are the Builders

by Raghuram Rajanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Politicians will not “build back better” with yet more vast packages of ineffective centralized programs. They must learn what communities want and need—and let them fulfill those wants and needs.

The Shape of Recovery

by Michael Spencevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The second half of this year is likely to bring a surge in pent-up demand, especially in high-value service industries.

Borrowed Time

by George P. Shultz, John F. Cogan, John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 15, 2021

The United States was already on a dangerous debt binge even before the pandemic. More reckless spending will overwhelm investment, growth, and job creation.

How to Kill Opportunity

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

There’s no doubt: the minimum wage deprives low-skilled workers—especially young people—of an essential foothold on the job market.

The High Road

by Elizabeth Economyvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The US-China rivalry represents, above all, a difference in values. The United States’ strength springs from its support for an open, multilateral world order.

Better Footing

by H. R. McMastervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

How to grapple with Chinese ambitions—military, economic, and ideological.

Taiwan as Trigger

by Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

American presidents come and go, but Beijing has never once taken its eyes off Taiwan, or ceased demanding it.

Freedom’s Struggle

by Michael R. Auslinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

With China increasingly dominant, nations in the Indo-Pacific seek their own paths between socialism and capitalism.

Ethiopia Unravels

by Jendayi Frazer, Judd Devermontvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Fresh conflict in the Horn of Africa is more than a humanitarian crisis—it’s a blow to regional security and US interests.

Studying War No More

by Peter Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The Abraham Accords established at least a nascent Arab-Israeli amity. Now educational programs can nurture it.

George Shultz’s Vision

by William J. Perry, Henry A. Kissinger, Sam Nunnvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The late statesman dreamed of eliminating the danger of nuclear weapons. His allies continue striving to make that dream a reality.

Getting It Right

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The push for open borders ignores the hard questions. How to ask—and answer—them.

Predators and Prey

by Ayaan Hirsi Alivia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Rising sexual violence in Europe—linked to young immigrant men—threatens women’s hard-earned rights. It must not be ignored.

How Schools Can Turn the Page

by Jonathan Movroydis interview with Clint Bolick, Kate J. Hardimanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

At a time of countless programs for reform, Clint Bolick and Kate J. Hardiman champion reforms that will work.

A Republic, if You Can Teach It

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

A new effort to teach civics education holds real promise—if our hoary K–12 system can be persuaded to try it.

This Is No Time to Stumble

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The Biden administration gets no honeymoon from geopolitical dangers.

Tarnished Gold

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021
Yesterday’s state of limitless promise is today’s state of smoke and mirrors—and broken promises.

Hope and Change in Indian Country?

by Terry Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

President Biden’s new interior secretary, Deb Haaland, has a chance to fix the system that leaves many of America’s first people poor and powerless. But will she take it?

The Road to Selfdom

by Russ Robertsvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

To Matthew Crawford, author of Why We Drive, the open road symbolizes the vanishing realm of human autonomy and skill.

The Man Who Wouldn’t Be Canceled

by Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The mob came for Laurence Fox, a brilliant British actor, after he made some mildly controversial remarks on the BBC. Refusing to apologize and vanish, Fox then launched a most public counterattack: a campaign for mayor of London.

“Turning People into Americans”

by Chris Walsh, William McKenzie interview with Niall Fergusonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Hoover fellow Niall Ferguson is optimistic that future immigrants will find their “kaleidoscopic identity” within the American experiment, just as so many others have done. Including him.

“Pluralism Is the Lifeblood”

by Chris Walsh, William McKenzie interview with Timothy Garton Ashvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

How do healthy democracies embrace both differences and common values? Hoover fellow Timothy Garton Ash discusses the crucial balance—and the danger that lies “down the road of identity politics.”

Small Kindnesses

by Condoleezza Ricevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Looking back on a year of great tumult and, at times, reassurance.

Disruptive Strategies

by Jonathan Movroydis interview with David Berkeyvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

A new military-history book edited by Hoover fellow David Berkey explores the repeated collisions of rising and established powers.

Operation Tagil

by Bertrand M. Patenaudevia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The Paris archive of the imperial Russian secret police is among Hoover’s most treasured holdings. How it landed on the Stanford campus is a cloak-and-dagger tale worthy of the collection.

Return to Chernobyl

by Anatol Shmelevvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Thirty-five years ago, a nuclear disaster unfolded in Ukraine. The Soviet empire, too, was about to melt down. Archival materials illuminate those times of danger and dissolution.

On the Cover

via Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Julie Helen Heyneman (1868–1942) spent her childhood and youth in San Francisco, where she attended classes at the Art Students League. She sailed for Europe in 1891 to immerse herself in art. Living in London, she became a pupil and lifelong friend of John Singer Sargent, the noted portrait painter. 

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