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Intellections

The Economics Of House Hunting Envy: How Regulations That Restrict Supply Harm Home Buyers

by Milton Friedman, Richard A. Epstein, Thomas Sowellvia PolicyEd.org
Thursday, December 1, 2016

The supply and demand of housing in your community explains why housing prices are high or low.

Intellections

The Government And Your House’s Price Tag: How Regulations That Restrict Supply Harm Home Buyers

by Milton Friedman, Richard A. Epstein, Thomas Sowellvia PolicyEd.org
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Housing prices have increased in many parts of the country. If housing prices are the result of supply and demand, why hasn't supply risen to meet higher demand? Who keeps housing from expanding?

Intellections

No Vacancy: The Consequences Of Rent Control

by Richard A. Epstein, Milton Friedman, Thomas Sowellvia PolicyEd.org
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Housing prices have increased in many parts of the country. What can policy makers do to make housing more affordable? And what happens when their good intentions go awry? Rent control increases demand for controlled-units, but discourages landlords from expanding or entering the rental market, which decreases the supply of rental housing.

Intellections

Growth Is Good: Why Slow Growth Can’t Be The New Normal

by John H. Cochranevia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, November 16, 2016
America’s economy is growing at half the rate it used to. Slow growth rates have enormous effects on the quality of life over long periods of time. Getting back to rapid economic growth will alleviate budgetary problems, increase paychecks, and lead to widely shared prosperity.
Intellections

Giving Patients Control Over Their Health Care

by Scott W. Atlasvia PolicyEd.org
Monday, November 14, 2016
Over time, health insurance has expanded to cover routine and predictable care, shifting away from the true purpose of insurance. This has driven health care costs through the roof. One way to lower costs while also improving the quality of health care is to expand the use of health accounts coupled with high-deductible insurance plans.
Intellections

The Importance Of Competition

by John H. Cochranevia PolicyEd.org
Monday, October 17, 2016
Industries without much competition are marked by high prices, low customer service, and a lack of innovation. But when competition thrives in a market, consumers get better goods and services at lower prices. Existing producers in the market don’t like competition, but it’s good for consumers. Some businesses will succeed and others will fail. But as long as it is easy for new competitors to enter the market, prices will stay low and innovation will continue.
Intellections

Socialism’s Empty Promises

by Milton Friedman, David Davenport, Allan H. Meltzer, Thomas Sowellvia PolicyEd.org
Monday, October 17, 2016
Many Americans believe socialism to be a form of social kindness by the government. But true socialism isn’t a social safety net. It is when the government controls most prices, businesses, property, and other aspects of economic life. The historical record of socialism has been wrecked or stagnating economies and flagrant human rights violations. The truth borne of a hundred years of hard experience is that people do not prosper in socialist countries.
Intellections

What’s Wrong With Health Insurance In America?

by Scott W. Atlasvia PolicyEd.org
Monday, October 17, 2016
Reforming health insurance in this country begins with redefining our understanding of what insurance is and what it supposed to cover. Insurance isn’t for routine or predictable expenses. Over time, we have come to expect all of our health care to be provided through insurance, and covering more has helped make health insurance cost more.
Intellections

Think Before You Act: Defining The Political End State

by General Jim Mattis, Kori Schakevia PolicyEd.org
Monday, October 17, 2016
When we decide we need to take military action, how do we make sure we do it right? Whether it’s fighting against ISIS in the Middle East, driving the Iraqis out of Kuwait, or confronting the Axis Powers in World War II, every military campaign should start with a very clear idea of how we want the situation to end – what we call a “clearly defined political end state.”
Econ 1 w/ John Taylor

The Budget Process

by John B. Taylorvia PolicyEd.org
Monday, October 17, 2016

This video presents a major component of fiscal policy: the complexity of the budget process. In recent years Congress’ lengthy budget debates, characterized by a strong difference of opinion between the House and the Senate, have been eventually resolved in a democratic process. Although the uncertainty in the process is a concern to fiscal policy, this video presents a clear timeline of how important the nature of the budget process is to the economy.

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Educating Americans about Public Policy

The digital media revolution has transformed the way people obtain information and form opinions. Countless partisan outlets peddle assertions and “sound bites” as indisputable facts. Few people have the knowledge and analytical skills to navigate this torrent of misinformation. They crave credible and accessible sources of facts, analysis, and information about proposed policies and the effects of those already enacted.


The Hoover Institution

Since its founding nearly 100 years ago, Stanford University’s Hoover Institution has sought to promote economic opportunity and prosperity, secure peace, and improve the human condition. Unique among policy research organizations, Hoover is part of a world-renowned university. In addition to being scholars, our fellows are educators.

Seeking to become the foremost source of policy knowledge, wisdom, and insights, we have launched the Mary Jo and Dick Kovacevich Initiative at the Hoover Institution, Educating Americans in Public Policy. The initiative seeks to:

  • Equip Americans with accurate facts and information, as well as a discerning analytical perspective, so they can better perform their civic duties, hold their elected leaders accountable, and “secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.”
  • Provide political leaders with reliable knowledge and analysis—tools with which they might assess alternatives in the shaping and execution of public policy.

This effort will build on our legacy of substantive policy inquiry where partisan advocacy has become the norm.

 
The Hoover Institution acknowledges significant gifts in support of its Education Americans in Public Policy initiative from the following generous and committed family foundations and individuals:

    Mary Jo and Dick Kovacevich Family Foundation
    S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation
    Kurt and Julie Hauser
    E.A. and Suzanne Maas
    Frank and Mona Mapel