Eric Hanushek

Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow in Education
Awards and Honors:
National Academy of Education
Biography: 

Eric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow and a member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education at the Hoover Institution. A leader in the development of the economic analysis of educational issues, his research spans the impact on achievement of teacher quality, high-stakes accountability, and class-size reduction. He pioneered measuring teacher quality on the basis of student achievement, the foundation for current research into the value-added evaluations of teachers and schools. His work on school efficiency is central to debates about school finance adequacy and equity; his analyses of the economic impact of school outcomes motivate both national and international educational policy design.

Hanushek is also chairman of the Executive Committee for the Texas Schools Project at the University of Texas at Dallas, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and area coordinator for Economics of Education with the CESifo Research Network. He formerly served as chair of the Board of Directors of the National Board for Education Sciences.

His latest book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth, identifies the close link between the skills of the people and the economic growth of the nation and shows the economic impact of high quality schools. This analysis is the basis for estimating the economic benefits of a world development standard based on achieving basic skills (Universal Basic Skills: What Countries Stand to Gain). His prior book, Endangering Prosperity: A Global View of the American School, considers the performance of U.S. schools from an international perspective and identifies the costs of not improving student outcomes. Earlier books include Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses, Courting Failure, Handbook on the Economics of Education, The Economics of Schooling and School Quality, Improving America’s Schools, Making Schools Work, Educational Performance of the Poor, and Education and Race, along with numerous widely cited articles in professional journals.

Hanushek previously held academic appointments at the University of Rochester, Yale University, and the US Air Force Academy and served in government as deputy director of Congressional Budget Office. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and the International Academy of Education along with being a fellow of the Society of Labor Economists and the American Education Research Association. He was awarded the Fordham Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in 2004.

A distinguished graduate of the United States Air Force Academy, he completed his PhD in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served in the US Air Force from 1965 to 1974.

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Recent Commentary

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Focus On Teaching, Not Just Masks And Hand-Sanitizer

by Eric Hanushekvia EducationNext
Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Education discussions today have a time horizon of three months. In the fall, will we mix at-home with in-school? Does everybody have a digital hookup? Should we have police in schools? As important as these issues are, they have the unfortunate effect of pushing aside more fundamental issues that could have much greater impact. This twin crisis of Covid-19 and of societal recognition of deep-seated inequities must be directed toward essential school improvement.

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Preparing All Students To Succeed During COVID-19 Pandemic

by Eric Hanushekvia The Washington Times
Thursday, June 25, 2020

All education discussions today have a time horizon of three months. What will we do in the fall? Will we mix at-home with in-school? Does everybody have a digital hookup? Should we have police in schools? As important as these issues are, they have the unfortunate effect of pushing more fundamental issues that could have much greater impact out of the discussion.

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Eric Hanushek And Margaret Raymond: COVID-19 And Schools | Hoover Virtual Policy Briefing

interview with Eric Hanushek, Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Hoover Podcasts
Thursday, May 14, 2020

AUDIO ONLY

Hoover Institution Fellows Eric Hanushek And Margaret Raymond discuss COVID-19 And Schools.

Eric Hanushek and Margaret Raymond: COVID-19 and Schools

interview with Eric Hanushek, Margaret (Macke) Raymondvia Hoover Virtual Policy Briefings
Thursday, May 14, 2020

A Hoover Virtual Policy Briefing with Eric Hanushek and Margaret Raymond: COVID-19 and Schools
Thursday, May 14, 2020 at 11AM PT/ 2PM ET.

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Long-Run Trends In The U.S. SES-Achievement Gap

by Eric Hanushek, Paul E. Peterson, Laura M. Talpey, Ludger Woessmannvia Analysis
Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Rising inequality in the United States has raised concerns about potentially widening gaps in educational achievement by socio-economic status (SES). Using assessments from LTT-NAEP, Main-NAEP, TIMSS, and PISA that are psychometrically linked over time, we trace trends in achievement for U.S. student cohorts born between 1954 and 2001. 

Analysis and Commentary

The Education Exchange: How To Increase Stagnant Teacher Salaries

by Paul E. Peterson interview with Eric Hanushekvia The Education Exchange
Monday, February 10, 2020

The Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow in Education at the Hoover Institution, Eric Hanushek, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss a new paper by Hanushek that offers guidelines for states and local governments on how to raise teacher pay in a way that best supports improved student achievement.

In the NewsNews/ Media

Teachers Deserve Higher Pay. Should The Money Come From Pension Funds?

featuring Eric Hanushekvia The Washington Post
Wednesday, February 5, 2020

The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University has always seemed to me a conservative think tank, dominated by a 285-foot tower honoring a one-term president who was born in 1874. Students are drawn to Stanford not by Hoover but by the university’s involvement in the thrilling innovations of the 21st century.

HESI Policy AnalysisFeatured

The Unavoidable: Tomorrow's Teacher Compensation

by Eric Hanushekvia Hoover Education Success Initiative | The Papers
Thursday, January 30, 2020

States and localities cannot avoid dealing with issues of teacher compensation. Not only is it the largest budget item for many local governments, but also it is the place of largest leverage for improving the quality of schools.

News/ Media

Executive Summary "The Unavoidable: Tomorrow's Teacher Compensation

by Eric Hanushekvia Hoover Education Success Initiative
Thursday, January 30, 2020

An executive summary of the policy analysis "The Unavoidable: Tomorrow's Teacher Compensation," from the Hoover Education Success Initiative.

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It’s Not “for the Children”

by Eric Hanushekvia Hoover Digest
Monday, January 20, 2020

Striking for more money serves the needs of teachers, not students. To put pupils’ needs first, boost the salaries of effective teachers.

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