Sunday, December 1, 2013

Issue 09

Is our NATO ally Turkey emerging as a regional power that is hostile, neutral, or can remain a partner to American strategic concerns?
Background Essay
Poster Collection, TU 28, Hoover Institution Archives
Background Essay

Turkey at the Crossroads

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013

Turkey is in the midst of an era of dramatic change. That matters in a big way for both American foreign policy and the world, because Turkey is of enormous strategic significance. It is a big and important country. With a population of 74 million people, Turkey is larger than Britain or France, and in area it is slightly larger than Texas. The population is industrious and increasingly wealthy.

Featured Commentary
Hoover Institution Archives Poster Collection, RU/SU 205
Featured Commentary

Turkey's Struggles Point to the Need for Allies

by Walter Russell Mead via Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013

The Republic of Turkey is geographically, politically, and culturally, an odd-looking member in an alliance known as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Turkey has a long coastline washed by the Black Sea, the Sea of Marmara, the Aegean Sea, and the Mediterranean, but it is hundreds of miles from the Atlantic. Turkish democracy for most of NATO’s history could best be described as an aspiration rather than a reality.

Hoover Institution Archives Poster Collection, RU/SU 196
Featured Commentary

The U.S. Should Be Thankful for Turkey

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Sunday, December 1, 2013

The emergence of Turkey as the most powerful regional player in the Middle East should not surprise Americans. Of all the Middle Eastern Islamic nations, it is the only one that has adapted to the modern world with any degree of success.