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Friday, September 24, 2021

Issue 75

America After Afghanistan
Background Essay
Background Essay

Our Revels Now Are Ended

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

It’s hard to win a war when you refuse to understand your enemy. It’s harder still when you cannot realistically define your strategic mission. You lame yourself further when you reduce a complex history to a single inaccurate cliché; i.e., “Afghanistan is the graveyard of empires.”

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Afghanistan Post-Mortem

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

The United States has lost its longest war. After twenty years of conflict and nation building in Afghanistan, the U.S.-backed Afghan regime collapsed like a house of cards in just a few weeks after the announced departure of American and NATO troops from the country. A final flurry of activity by the U.S. military managed to rescue 123,000 people from Kabul, but as Winston Churchill once said of Dunkirk, “Wars are not won by evacuations.”

Featured Commentary

Dented, Not Damaged: The American Empire After Afghanistan

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

When small, even middle-sized powers make grievous mistakes like fighting a losing war or ignoring deadly threats, they risk their place in the global hierarchy or, worse, their existence. Thus did France and Britain when they failed to fight Nazi Germany in the Thirties while still in position of strategic superiority. 

E.g., 10 / 16 / 2021
E.g., 10 / 16 / 2021
Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Issue 63

Should the United States Leave the Middle East?

Background Essay

by Edward N. Luttwak Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article

Featured Commentary

by Peter R. Mansoor Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. Tuesday, March 31, 2020
article
Friday, December 27, 2019

Issue 62

Is the Mediterranean Still Geo-strategically Essential?

Background Essay

by Barry Strauss Friday, December 27, 2019
article

Featured Commentary

by Ralph Peters Friday, December 27, 2019
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Friday, December 27, 2019
article

Related Commentary

by Gordon G. Chang Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Chris Gibson Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Jakub Grygiel Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Josef Joffe Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Robert G. Kaufman Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Mark Moyar Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Christopher R. O'Dea Thursday, November 7, 2019
article
by Ralph Peters Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Hy Rothstein Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Nadia Schadlow Friday, January 10, 2020
article
by Bing West Friday, January 10, 2020
article
Friday, December 20, 2019

Issue 61

Tariffs and Embargoes

Background Essay

by John B. Taylor Friday, December 20, 2019
article

Featured Commentary

by Gordon G. Chang Friday, December 20, 2019
article
by Robert G. Kaufman Friday, December 20, 2019
article
Friday, September 6, 2019

Issue 60

The Monroe Doctrine and Current U.S. Foreign Policy

Background Essay

by Williamson Murray Friday, September 6, 2019
article

Featured Commentary

by Chris Gibson Friday, September 6, 2019
article
by Bing West Friday, September 6, 2019
article

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Related Commentary

The Defense of Taiwan: A Matter of Willingness, not Capability

by Seth Cropseyvia Strategika
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Taiwan lies within the United States’ defense umbrella out of strategic necessity. It is the critical link in the First Island Chain. If the chain is broken, China will be able to roll up U.S. defenses, attacking Japan and the Philippines from their exposed, Pacific-facing flanks.

Related Commentary

Put Nukes on Taiwan

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

For three generations, U.S. diplomats have purchased what they imagined to be the Chinese Communist Party’s good will by serial reductions in America’s own geopolitical interest in Taiwan. They have refused to see that tiny Taiwan is key to Beijing’s political vulnerabilities and ambitions.

Related Commentary

Taiwan: Deterrence of China Is Failing

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Taiwan, the Economist proclaims on its May 1-7 cover, is “the most dangerous place on earth.”

Featured Commentary

Taiwan: Time For A Real Discussion

by Admiral Gary Rougheadvia Strategika
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

There has been a spate of recent articles proffering when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) will likely be capable of invading Taiwan. The prognostications are interesting but unhelpful as they distract from the reality of the range of coercive actions the PRC may impose on Taiwan and what could happen now as a result of the PRC increasing pressure and a related military accident or misstep in the vicinity of Taiwan.

Featured Commentary

Realism And Deterrence In Cross-Strait Relations

by Joseph Feltervia Strategika
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) leadership has never felt more confident that its increasingly capable military could be deployed to successfully seize Taiwan by force. Decades of expanding defense budgets and investment in military modernization have significantly enhanced the CCP’s potential to project power across the Taiwan Strait.

Background Essay

Will America Defend Taiwan? Here’s What History Says

by Ian Eastonvia Strategika
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

In December 1949, Chiang Kai-shek moved the capitol of the Republic of China (ROC) to Taipei. He intended the relocation to be temporary. He had already moved his government multiple times: when the Empire of Japan invaded China, when World War II ended, and again when Mao Zedong’s Communist insurgents took the upper hand in the Chinese Civil War.

Strategika

Strategika Issue 72: Chinese Communist Party Propaganda

via Strategika
Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Strategika Issue 72 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Featured Commentary

A Day of Joy for the State within a State

by Christopher R. O'Deavia Strategika
Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Among the container ships waiting for a berth at the port of Long Beach during the ocean-carrier traffic jam early this year were vessels of COSCO Shipping. The Chinese state-owned shipping company sails under the guidance of Captain Panda, a jolly stuffed-bear skipper decked out in crisp blue and gold nautical officer’s garb befitting the leader of one of the most powerful organizations of the Middle Kingdom.

Featured Commentary

China’s Propaganda: Ludicrous, Malicious, Extremely Effective

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Wednesday, May 5, 2021

“So let me say here that, in front of the Chinese side, the United States does not have the qualification to say that it wants to speak to China from a position of strength,” said China’s top diplomat, Yang Jiechi, to Secretary of State Antony Blinken and National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan, at the now-famous showdown in Anchorage in the middle of March.

Background Essay

Beijing’s Woke Propaganda War in America

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Propaganda is older than the medieval printing press, and every communications innovation increases the propagandists’ reach. Westerners most often think of propaganda coming from its two ardent twentieth-century practitioners: the German Nazis and the Soviet communists.

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.