Strategika

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Friday, September 24, 2021

Issue 75

America After Afghanistan
Background Essay
Background Essay

Our Revels Now Are Ended

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

It’s hard to win a war when you refuse to understand your enemy. It’s harder still when you cannot realistically define your strategic mission. You lame yourself further when you reduce a complex history to a single inaccurate cliché; i.e., “Afghanistan is the graveyard of empires.”

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Afghanistan Post-Mortem

by Peter R. Mansoorvia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

The United States has lost its longest war. After twenty years of conflict and nation building in Afghanistan, the U.S.-backed Afghan regime collapsed like a house of cards in just a few weeks after the announced departure of American and NATO troops from the country. A final flurry of activity by the U.S. military managed to rescue 123,000 people from Kabul, but as Winston Churchill once said of Dunkirk, “Wars are not won by evacuations.”

Featured Commentary

Dented, Not Damaged: The American Empire After Afghanistan

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, September 24, 2021

When small, even middle-sized powers make grievous mistakes like fighting a losing war or ignoring deadly threats, they risk their place in the global hierarchy or, worse, their existence. Thus did France and Britain when they failed to fight Nazi Germany in the Thirties while still in position of strategic superiority. 

E.g., 10 / 26 / 2021
E.g., 10 / 26 / 2021
Monday, June 25, 2018

Issue 51

Nuclear Proliferation

Background Essay

by Gordon G. Chang Monday, June 25, 2018
article

Featured Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Monday, June 25, 2018
article
by Thomas Karako Monday, June 25, 2018
article
Thursday, April 26, 2018

Issue 50

Pakistan's Partnership with the United States

Background Essay

by Peter R. Mansoor Thursday, April 26, 2018
article

Featured Commentary

by Ralph Peters Thursday, April 26, 2018
article
by Bing West Thursday, April 26, 2018
article
Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Issue 49

The Value of Economic Sanctions

Background Essay

by Josef Joffe Thursday, March 29, 2018
article

Featured Commentary

by Angelo M. Codevilla Thursday, March 29, 2018
article
by Thomas Donnelly Thursday, March 29, 2018
article

Related Commentary

by Thomas H. Henriksen Tuesday, July 18, 2017
article
by Reuel Marc Gerecht, Mark Dubowitz Sunday, November 10, 2013
article
by Bruce Thornton Tuesday, July 21, 2015
article
by Thomas H. Henriksen Friday, October 30, 1998
article
Monday, February 26, 2018

Issue 48

U.S. Military Policy in Afghanistan

Background Essay

by Hy Rothstein, John Arquilla Monday, February 26, 2018
article

Featured Commentary

by Bing West Monday, February 26, 2018
article
by Max Boot Monday, February 26, 2018
article

Related Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Monday, February 26, 2018
article
by Mark Moyar Monday, February 26, 2018
article
by Ralph Peters Monday, February 26, 2018
article

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Background Essay

Is There A Russia Card?

by Seth Cropseyvia Strategika
Thursday, January 28, 2021

Vladimir Putin’s arrest of Alexei Navalny, the nationwide protests that followed, and the Solar Winds cyber-attack demonstrate the rough veneer of U.S.–Russia relations that President Biden must now navigate. An Obama-era “reset” is out of the question.

Related Commentary

The Unseen Costs of the Coronavirus for China

by Bing Westvia Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Looking into my crystal ball, I do not see the world community imposing any overt, adverse strategic consequences upon China in response to its criminally irresponsible conduct in regard to COVID-19.

Related Commentary

Responses to China and the Virus

by Barry Straussvia Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Li-Meng Yan, MD and others have claimed that China manufactured the SARS-CoV-2 virus in a lab and that it suppressed information about the danger of human-to-human transmission. China’s militarily controlled Wuhan Institute is said now to have the ability to manufacture additional pandemic viruses as well.

Related Commentary

China and the Wuhan Coronavirus: Strategic Consequences

by Paul Rahevia Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

There is no reason to suppose that it might someday be discovered that China was experimenting in and before 2019 with enhancing the coronavirus that caused the pandemic of 2020, and that criminal laxity or worse on the part of the Chinese government explains its spread

Related Commentary

Pandemic Impact on China’s Global Expansion: Delayed, but not Derailed

by Christopher R. O'Deavia Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Whatever the final verdict on China’s intent with respect to coronavirus research and the nature of its complicity in the release and spread of SARS-CoV-2, the pandemic is likely to delay, but not derail, China’s global initiatives to expand its economic leverage and political influence.

Related Commentary

Reckless and Rash: China and the Pandemic

by Edward N. Luttwak via Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

In response to accusations that COVID-19 was deliberately made by protein transplantation, implying that the Wuhan Institute of Virology’s safety-level 4 lab was engaged in biological warfare, virologists around the world vehemently protested its innocence.

Featured Commentary

Will The Covid-19 Pandemic Confound Or Enable China’s Strategic Ambitions?

by Robert G. Kaufmanvia Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Will China’s negligence unleashing the coronavirus and mendacity exploiting it catalyze a reckoning with the PRC, comparable in significance to the Czech Coup of 1948? And will it crystallize long-term American determination to contest China’s scheme to supplant the United States as the world’s preeminent power? 

Featured Commentary

China Deliberately Spread The Coronavirus: What Are The Strategic Consequences?

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

“It comes from the lab, the lab in Wuhan, and the lab is controlled by the China government,” claimed Dr. Li-Meng Yan, the virologist who fled Hong Kong, in a “Loose Women” interview in September. “This virus is not from nature.”

Background Essay

Remedies For China’s Role In The Pandemic

by John Yoovia Strategika
Wednesday, December 9, 2020

The more we learn about the origins of the coronavirus, the more the case against China grows. Chinese doctors and scientists encountered COVID-19 patients as early as November 2019, but Beijing suppressed their efforts to research the virus and warn the world. While the emergence of vaccines holds hope for an end to the pandemic, the campaign to hold China to account, however, is only beginning.

Strategika

Strategika Issue 68: Crisis In The Eastern Mediterranean

via Strategika
Monday, October 26, 2020

Strategika Issue 68 is now available online. Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

Is there a military solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.