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Thursday, January 17, 2019

Issue 56

The Defense of Europe
Background Essay
Background Essay

European Defense

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Strategika
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Europe was never a full partner in its own defense. The very question—Will Europe ever fully partner with the U.S., or will the European Union and NATO continue to downplay the necessity of military readiness?—is no longer meaningful as posed, because the political energies of Europe’s elites are absorbed as they try to fend off attacks on their legitimacy by broad sectors of their population.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

NATO Renewed (Coming Soon To A Theater Of War Near You)

by Ralph Petersvia Strategika
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Clio, the muse of history, has a fabulous sense of irony: As the human pageant unfolds, she delights in confounding our intentions and expectations. Thus, two public enemies of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (whose acronym, NATO, sounds like another Greek deity) promise to be the unwitting saviors of the alliance, rescuing it from complacency, lethargy, and diminishing relevance.

Featured Commentary

Urging More From Our NATO Allies

by Robert G. Kaufmanvia Strategika
Thursday, January 17, 2019

The United States should never expect to achieve full burden-sharing with the European members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Even in the most balanced alliances, the most powerful member will pay some premium for ensuring its credibility and effectiveness. The United States can strive plausibly to minimize but not eliminate the massive degree of free riding and strategic incoherence that has become politically untenable and strategically unwise. 

E.g., 3 / 22 / 2019
E.g., 3 / 22 / 2019
Friday, December 4, 2015

Issue 28

Why is Germany a non-nuclear power and will it ever become one?

Background Essay

by Thomas Donnelly Friday, December 4, 2015
article

Featured Commentary

by Josef Joffe Friday, December 4, 2015
article
by Russell A. Berman Friday, December 4, 2015
article

Related Commentary

by Josiah Bunting III Friday, December 4, 2015
article
Thursday, October 29, 2015

Issue 27

Missile Defense: Given the specter of more emerging nuclear powers, how and where should the U.S. focus its missile defense capability?

Background Essay

by Kiron K. Skinner Friday, October 30, 2015
article

Featured Commentary

by Victor Davis Hanson Friday, October 30, 2015
article
by Frederick W. Kagan Friday, October 30, 2015
article

Related Commentary

by Bruce Thornton Friday, October 30, 2015
article
Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Issue 26

Arms Reduction; "Do past arms control treaties offer insight about the proposed Iran nuclear agreement?"

Background Essay

by Angelo M. Codevilla Tuesday, August 25, 2015
article

Featured Commentary

by Walter Russell Mead Tuesday, August 25, 2015
article
by Barry Strauss Tuesday, August 25, 2015
article

Related Commentary

by Max Boot Tuesday, July 14, 2015
article
by Max Boot Tuesday, July 21, 2015
article
by Max Boot Monday, August 10, 2015
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, April 2, 2015
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Thursday, July 23, 2015
article
by Bruce Thornton Sunday, April 5, 2015
article
by Bruce Thornton Thursday, July 16, 2015
article
Poster Collection, US 06031, Hoover Institution Archives.
Monday, July 27, 2015

Issue 25

Does Political Correctness Pose a Threat to the Military?

Background Essay

by Williamson Murray Monday, July 27, 2015
article

Featured Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Monday, July 27, 2015
article
by Andrew Roberts Monday, July 27, 2015
article

Related Commentary

by Josiah Bunting III Monday, July 27, 2015
article
by Mark Moyar Monday, July 27, 2015
article
by Bing West Monday, July 27, 2015
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Monday, July 27, 2015
article

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Related Commentary

America’s Foreign Policy Crisis

by Bruce Thorntonvia Defining Ideas
Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Leaders and voters can’t decide between isolationism, realism, and idealism. 

Featured Commentary

Preemptive Strikes and Preventive Wars: A Historian’s Perspective

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Preventive wars and preemptive strikes are both risky business. A preventive war is a military, diplomatic, and strategic endeavor, aimed at an enemy whom one expects to grow so strong that delay would cause defeat. A preemptive strike is a military operation or series of operations to preempt an enemy’s ability to attack you. In both cases, a government judges a diplomatic solution impossible.

Featured Commentary

Calculating The Risk Of Preventive War

by Max Bootvia Strategika
Tuesday, August 29, 2017

The issue of “preemptive” war is more in the news now than at any time since the invasion of Iraq in 2003. The impetus, of course, is the rapid development of North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs, which will soon give Pyongyang the capability to hit any American city with a nuclear-tipped ICBM. President Trump has been threatening “fire and fury” in response, and warning that the United States is “locked and loaded” for war. 

Background Essay

Preemptive Strike Or Preventive War?

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Tuesday, August 29, 2017

With the troubles bubbling over on the Korean Peninsula, as the North Korean regime approaches possession of nuclear weapons and missiles capable of striking the United States, two words, preemptive and preventive, have gained increasing currency. While similar in meaning, their context is crucial in understanding their applicability to the current crisis. And here, as is so often the case, history is a useful tool in thinking through the possibilities. 

Related Commentary

Tale Of The Tape: North Korea VS. Joint US-ROK Force

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia The Hill
Thursday, August 24, 2017

Escalating threats and counter-threats arising from the United States and North Korea have created an ominous standoff. President Trump warned Pyongyang that it faced “fire and fury” for aggression. The American leader added that “military solutions are now fully in place, locked and loaded” should it act foolishly. The Democratic People’s Republic kept up the rhetorical duel by threatening to engulf Guam with an “enveloping fire” of ballistic missiles.

Related Commentary

Considering Preemptive War

by Kori Schakevia Military History in the News
Thursday, August 10, 2017

President Trump set off a rhetorical hand grenade this week, threatening North Korea with “fire and fury like the world has never seen.” The Secretary of State rushed to reassure Americans that there was no imminent threat and they could “sleep safe at night.”

Featured Commentary

Beyond The Terror War

by Thomas Donnellyvia Strategika
Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Since the decline of the Ottoman Empire, the story of the Middle East has been one of inconclusive struggles of the weak against the weak. That the Ottomans lasted as long as they did is in substantial measure a testament to the constant chaos of Arab and Persian politics. 

Featured Commentary

The Middle East: Terrorism Forever?

by Bing West via Strategika
Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The short response is yes. Crime forever? Also, yes. Turbulence, terror, pestilence, famine, love, procreation, taxes, families, sunsets, rain, shine, etc.—all are components of the human condition. There is no arc toward perfection in human nature.

Background Essay

“Pushing Back” Iran

by Reuel Marc Gerechtvia Strategika
Wednesday, July 26, 2017

On both the left and the right, there is a consensus in Washington that the United States needs to “push back” against the Islamic Republic’s nefarious actions in the Levant, Iraq, and Yemen. The clerical regime largely controls the ground war in Syria: Tehran’s foreign Shiite militias, imported from Lebanon, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, and Iranian-directed native forces lead the battle against the Sunni insurrection. 

Related Commentary

The North Korean Threat

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Defining Ideas
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

How should the U.S. contain a rogue regime on the brink of acquiring nuclear-tipped intercontinental missiles?

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.