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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Issue 47

The State of U.S. Naval Readiness
Background Essay
Background Essay

The Sinews Of Empire

by Seth Cropseyvia Strategika
Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Modern scholars of politics revel in their complex descriptions of state action. Rather than oversimplifying and reducing the state to a unitary body, they separate its internal components and assess each of their relative strengths. There’s something to this.

Featured Commentary
Featured Commentary

Cornstalks, Calvinball, And The Bridges At Toko Ri: Rightsizing The U.S. Navy

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. via Strategika
Tuesday, January 16, 2018

The main street of Washington, Georgia, is called Toombs Avenue in honor of the Georgia senator and Civil War general who was born nearby. In promoting the South’s secession as the war approached, Toombs reportedly claimed, “We can beat those Yankees with cornstalks!”

Featured Commentary

A Stretched Navy And A Fiscal Disconnect

by Admiral Gary Rougheadvia Strategika
Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Last year, within two weeks’ time, two deadly collisions of U.S. Navy ships in western Pacific sea-lanes brought home the reality of a Navy in increasing demand yet stretched precariously thin. The captains and those responsible on watch those nights, as they operated in congested Asian waters, were held to account, but it remains the nation that has allowed and accepted the conditions that led to those tragic events and the loss of 17 sailors.

E.g., 2 / 24 / 2018
E.g., 2 / 24 / 2018
Harold Melvin Agnew Motion Picture Film, Hoover Institution Archives.
Sunday, June 1, 2014

Issue 15

Should more of our European or Pacific democratic allies possess nuclear weapons?
Okhrana Records, Box 237, Hoover Institution Archives.
Thursday, May 1, 2014

Issue 14

Are 20th-century-style conventional military assets and strategies still relevant, or are they being replaced by drones, cyber-warfare, counterinsurgency, and satellite technologies?
Poster Collection, RU/SU 2165, Hoover Institution Archives
Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Issue 13

Can or should the West try to stop Vladimir Putin's attempts to reabsorb portions of the old Soviet Union?

Background Essay

by Kori Schake Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article

Featured Commentary

by Thomas Donnelly Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article
by Ralph Peters Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article

Related Commentary

by Kiron K. Skinner Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article
by Peter R. Mansoor Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article
by Paul R. Gregory Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article
by Victor Davis Hanson Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article
by Angelo M. Codevilla Tuesday, April 1, 2014
article
Poster Collection, INT 503, Hoover Institution Archives
Saturday, March 1, 2014

Issue 12

What Will Afghanistan Look Like Following the Final U.S. Withdrawal in 2014?

Background Essay

by Max Boot Saturday, March 1, 2014
article

Featured Commentary

by Dr. Joseph Felter Saturday, March 1, 2014
article
by Kimberly Kagan Saturday, March 1, 2014
article
by Bing West Saturday, March 1, 2014
article

Related Commentary

by Mark Moyar Saturday, March 1, 2014
article
by Thomas Donnelly Saturday, March 1, 2014
article

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Featured Commentary

Brexit: How Much Contagion, How Many Strategic Consequences?

by Josef Joffevia Strategika
Friday, July 1, 2016

Will Britain’s departure from the EU set off a stampede, prompting other members to bolt? The probability ranges from “very low” to “nil.” Like Tolstoy’s oft-invoked unhappy family, every EU member is unhappy in his own way, but none will take the plunge. For one, everyone is feeling in his own body politic Britain’s buyer’s remorse on the day thereafter. The pound took the largest hit in more than thirty years.

Related Commentary

Brexit: Isolationism or Atlanticism?

by Max Bootvia Commentary
Monday, June 27, 2016

Britons might never have voted to leave the European Union had it not been for the refugee crisis that hit Europe as a result of the Syrian civil war. Even though Britain has accepted only some 5,000 Syrian refugees, German premier Angela Merkel agreed to take in 800,000, thus fueling fears across the continent of an influx of possible terrorists. 

Related Commentary

The EU-Progressive Paradigm is Falling Apart

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Monday, June 27, 2016

The rise of populist and patriotic passions.

The Classicist with Victor Davis Hanson:
Related Commentary

The Classicist: “Brexit and the Future of Europe”

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The Classicist
Friday, June 24, 2016

What the UK’s split from Brussels means for the future.

Related Commentary

Why Brexit alarms Britain’s Baltic allies

by Max Bootvia The Washington Post
Monday, June 20, 2016

The world is transfixed by Britain’s referendum Thursday over whether to stay in the European Union. Some of the most interested and anxious spectators of the “Brexit” debate are in the Baltic republics, where I recently spent a week meeting with political and military leaders as part of a delegation from the Jamestown Foundation.

Related Commentary

Learning What Not To Do: The North Korean Nuclear Example

by Miles Maochun Yuvia Strategika
Friday, May 27, 2016

There are no historical precedents to justify current American confidence that the treaty with Iran will prevent it from going nuclear. There are, however, historical precedents of how unauthorized and unhelpful secret back channels have derailed ongoing major U.S. governmental diplomatic initiatives and negotiations that involve difficult players.

Related Commentary

Blinded by the Light? What It Will Take for the Iran Deal to Succeed

by Bing West via Strategika
Friday, May 27, 2016

Before addressing history, it should be pointed out that the Obama agreement (it is not a treaty) provides Iran with the expertise, systems, and unimpeded bridge to nuclear weapons within about twelve years. Iran can abide by the agreement and still become a power with nuclear weapons.

Related Commentary

Iran Without Nuclear Weapons: We Can Only Hope

by Barry Strauss via Strategika
Friday, May 27, 2016

History suggests three ways to prevent a state that has the capacity of going nuclear from exercising that option. The first is a security guarantee in exchange for denuclearization. The former Soviet republic of Ukraine took this route in 1994, when it gave up its extensive nuclear stockpile and jointed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty upon a promise of respect for its territorial integrity from the United States, Britain, and Russia. 

Related Commentary

Reasons For Confidence In The Iran Deal

by Kori Schakevia Hoover Daily Report
Friday, May 27, 2016

There are historical precedents to justify current American confidence that the treaty with Iran will prevent it from going nuclear. In fact, Iran itself provides the most important precedents. Three factors have in the past caused Iran to curtail its nuclear weapons programs: high likelihood of exposure, belief the United States would destroy their weapons programs, and fear that military conflict with the United States would result in regime change in Iran.

Related Commentary

History Suggests the Iran Deal’s Chances for Success Are Slim

by Williamson Murrayvia Strategika
Friday, May 27, 2016

Unfortunately, there is little in the historical record to suggest that the current agreement with Iran that Secretary of State Kerry has recently concluded will in fact to do anything to prevent the Iranians from going nuclear when it suits their convenience and view of their strategic interests. For the moment, they will undoubtedly lie low and use the agreement to dismantle the sanctions that have represented such a major impediment to the successful functioning of their economy. 

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The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict strives to reaffirm the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. Read more.

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Strategika is an online journal that analyzes ongoing issues of national security in light of conflicts of the past—the efforts of the Military History Working Group of historians, analysts, and military personnel focusing on military history and contemporary conflict.

Our board of scholars shares no ideological consensus other than a general acknowledgment that human nature is largely unchanging. Consequently, the study of past wars can offer us tragic guidance about present conflicts—a preferable approach to the more popular therapeutic assumption that contemporary efforts to ensure the perfectibility of mankind eventually will lead to eternal peace. New technologies, methodologies, and protocols come and go; the larger tactical and strategic assumptions that guide them remain mostly the same—a fact discernable only through the study of history.

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The opinions expressed in Strategika are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Hoover Institution or Stanford University.