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A Muddle Wrapped in a Mystery

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Robert Conquest examines the prospects for peace and prosperity in Russia. His conclusion? "Cross your fingers."

Operation Osoaviakhim

by Norman M. Naimarkvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

In The Russians in Germany, Hoover fellow Norman M. Naimark has written a definitive account of the Soviet occupation of eastern Germany (later the German Democratic Republic, or East Germany) in the years immediately after World War II. All the Allies engaged in a postwar scramble for German scientists and technology, Naimark argues, but the Soviets, particularly dependent on acquiring German know-how, ordered German scientists rounded up and shipped to the Soviet Union. Here Naimark describes one such Soviet exercise.

Moscow's Secret Gold

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

In 1992, Boris Yeltsin outlawed the Communist Party, declaring it a criminal organization. Party leaders challenged Yeltsin in court. Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman has been examining the documents in this historic case.

A Brutal Debacle

by Richard F. Staarvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow Richard F. Staar portrays the 1994-1996 war that mighty Russia has waged on tiny Chechnya, a breakaway ethnic enclave on Russia's southern flank. This conflict has claimed some forty thousand civilian lives--and it continues to fester.

George P. Shultz on China and Bosnia

by George P. Shultzvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Hoover fellow and former Secretary of State George P. Shultz recently spent a morning talking about the challenges posed to U.S. foreign policy by China, one of the biggest countries on earth, and Bosnia, one of the smallest. Shultz answered questions put to him by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

Vladimirov's Russia

by Elena Danielsonvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Ivan Alekseevich Vladimirov led two lives. In public, he painted propaganda pictures, becoming a master of socialist realism. In private, he painted harrowing scenes of the Russian Revolution and its aftermath, achieving true realism. Scores of his sketchbooks and canvases are in the Hoover Archives. Here archivist Elena S. Danielson describes Vladimirov's life and work.

Trotsky, the Fugitive

by Robert Conquestvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, January 30, 1996

Although a leader of the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the brilliant theorist and orator Leon Trotsky was expelled from the Communist Party in 1927 and then, in 1929, banished from the Soviet Union. His crime? Opposing Stalin. In 1940, Stalin's secret police murdered Trotsky in Mexico. Reviewing a new biography of Trotsky, Hoover fellow Robert Conquest reflects on a man characterized both by ruthlessness and by "the glamor of the Lost Cause."

Books

The Kazakhs: Second Edition

by Martha Brill Olcottvia Hoover Institution Press
Friday, July 7, 1995

The major events that shaped the present day Islamic nation of Kazakhstan.

Books

Economic Transition in Eastern Europe and Russia: Realities of Reform

via Hoover Institution Press
Wednesday, March 1, 1995

Thirteen essays by acknowledged economic experts explore the rapid changes in the transition economies of Eastern Europe, with discussions on political and economic freedom, monetary control and privatization, labor markets and social safety nets, and taxation and crime.

Books

Mission and Betrayal 1940—1945: Working with Franklin Roosevelt to Help Save Britain and Europe

via Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, April 1, 1993

The wartime memoirs of Count Rene de Chambrun provide a fascinating inside look at the world of some of the most powerful leaders and social figures in America during the turbulent early 1940s. Utilizing the detailed notes he made during that period, de Chambrun recounts the story of his dramatic wartime years, touching casually and affectionately on his intimate relationships with historic personalities.

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