Sub-Saharan Africa

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A Black Man Confronts Africa

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell examines a new book, Out of America: A Black Man Confronts Africa. The book is honest, Sowell finds, a quality that by itself is enough to render the volume "almost shocking."

Democracy in Congo? Laugh On

by Robert J. Barrovia Hoover Digest
Thursday, October 30, 1997

No sooner had Laurent Kabila overthrown the dictator of Zaire, Mobutu Sese Seko, and renamed the country the Democratic Republic of Congo than Westerners began clamoring for Kabila to hold elections. The response of Hoover fellow Robert J. Barro? "You have to be kidding."

Is There Hope for Africa?

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Fifty-three nations occupy the continent of Africa. Only two have remained democratic since achieving independence. Hoover fellow Larry Diamond surveys the changes that must take place if democracy is ever to supplant Africa's corrupt, authoritarian regimes.

Leave Somalia Alone

via Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Almost four years after the U.S. mission to Somalia ended in catastrophe, some Americans still feel an urge to lend Somalia a helping hand. Yet as Hoover fellow Robert J. Myers explains, there is only one kind of people who can make a difference in Somalia: Somalis.

Prospects for Democratic Development in Africa

by Larry Diamondvia Analysis
Wednesday, January 1, 1997

Although Africa has been one of the least democratic regions of the world, it has been experiencing widespread pressures for democratic change since 1990. Although pressure-from both domestic civil societies and international donors-has failed to bring about a transition to democracy in most cases, it has succeeded in many. Today, about a third of all African countries are at least electoral democracies, and virtually all regimes in sub-Saharan Africa have at least legalized opposition parties. Conventional political science theories view Africa's democratic prospects as grim because of its extreme poverty and deep ethnic divisions. This essay takes a more hopeful and "developmental" view. It argues that democratic change can occur in Africa and must if it is to develop economically. But this will inevitably involve a long-term process of political and social change and, in particular, institution building. African countries need new, more appropriate, and more effective institutions to control corruption, provide a market-oriented enabling environment for economic growth, and generate incentives for political parties to craft broad multiethnic appeals and constituencies. If institutions of governance, electoral politics, and civil society can be strengthened and innovatively designed, there is hope for democracy in Africa. But this will also require heavy international conditionality and pressure for more responsible policies and more effective institutions, as well as greater international support for those African regimes that appear serious about democracy and good governance. African societies are ready for a new democratic beginning, but they require the right institutional frameworks at home and vigorous engagement of the international community if deeply entrenched patterns of statism, corruption, repression, ethnic exclusion, and violence are to be overcome.

Books

Hope for South Africa?

by Peter J. Duignan, Lewis H. Gannvia Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, January 1, 1991

In this book the authors examine the the country's power structure, economy, politics and the ways in which various branches of government and the private sector interact, and envision a prosperious South Africa built on the principles of a free market economy and parliamentary compromise.

Books

Colonial Office and Nigeria, 1898–1914

by John M. Carlandvia Hoover Institution Press
Monday, April 1, 1985

Conventional scholarly wisdom supports the notion that the Colonial Office did little more than coordinate and review the proposals of others during the administrative occupation of Africa. 

Books

From Protest to Challenge: A Documentary History of African Politics in South Africa, 1882–1964: Vol. 2: Hope and Challenge, 1935–1952 ;1964

via Hoover Institution Press
Friday, June 1, 1973

This remarkable collection of material is as relevant today as when it was first published; graphically demonstrating the native African's struggle for peace, freedom, and equality in his native land during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Books

From Protest to Challenge: A Documentary History of African Politics in South Africa, 1882–-1964: Vol. 1: Protest and Hope, 1882–1934

via Hoover Institution Press
Saturday, January 1, 1972

This remarkable collection of material is as relevant today as when it was first published; graphically demonstrating the native African's struggle for peace, freedom, and equality in his native land during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Pages