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The Libertarian: North Korea And Trump’s Foreign Policy

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Friday, June 15, 2018

Was the summit with Kim Jong-un a diplomatic breakthrough or a fool’s errand?

Interviews

Jamil Jaffer: Is Apple Doing The Right Thing In Closing A Security Loophole Used By Police?

interview with Jamil Jaffervia CNBC
Thursday, June 14, 2018
Hoover Institution fellow Jamil Jaffer discussess whether Apple is doing the right thing in closing a security loophole used by police to gain access to iPhone user data, especially in catching criminals.
Analysis and Commentary

Modern Privacy Advocacy: An Approach At War With Privacy Itself?

by Jamil Jaffer, Justin Hurwitzvia Regulatory Transparency Project
Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Privacy is one of the defining policy issues of our time. In the digital era, privacy concerns are omnipresent.  From advertisers and online platforms seemingly tracking our every move online, to ongoing discussions about law enforcement’s need for access to encrypted communications to protect us against terrorists and other violent criminals, to the geopolitics of countries spying on one another’s citizens, concerns about individual privacy arise constantly in the public and private spheres, both domestically and abroad.

In the News

The Cybersecurity 202: We Surveyed 100 Experts. A Majority Rejected The FBI's Push For Encryption Back Doors.

quoting Jamil Jaffervia The Washington Post
Monday, June 11, 2018

The FBI has said that its inability to access encrypted cellphones during investigations leaves the country less safe. But a strong 72 percent majority of digital security experts surveyed by The Cybersecurity 202 disagree.

Featured

Strengths Become Vulnerabilities: How A Digital World Disadvantages The United States In Its International Relations

by Jack Goldsmith, Stuart Russellvia Lawfare Blog
Wednesday, June 6, 2018

We have a new essay in the Hoover Aegis series called “Strengths Become Vulnerabilities: How a Digital World Disadvantages the United States in its International Relations.”  It seeks to explain why the United States is struggling to deal with the “soft” cyber operations that have been so prevalent in recent years: cyberespionage and cybertheft, often followed by strategic publication; information operations and propaganda; and relatively low-level cyber disruptions such as denial-of-service and ransomware attacks. 

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Strengths Become Vulnerabilities

by Jack Goldsmith, Stuart Russellvia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, June 5, 2018

This essay seeks to explain why the United States is struggling to deal with the “soft” cyberoperations that have been so prevalent in recent years: cyberespionage and cybertheft, often followed by strategic publication; information operations and propaganda; and relatively low-level cyber disruptions such as denial-of-service and ransomware attacks. The main explanation for the struggle is that constituent elements of U.S. society—a commitment to free speech, privacy, and the rule of law, innovative technology firms, relatively unregulated markets, and deep digital sophistication—create asymmetric weaknesses that foreign adversaries, especially authoritarian ones, can exploit. We do not claim that the disadvantages of digitalization for the United States outweigh the advantages, but we present reasons for pessimism.

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Area 45: Anticipating Global Insecurity With Amy Zegart

interview with Amy Zegartvia Area 45
Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Lessons learned in keeping cargo planes moving, hotel guests protected – and possibly coffee customers better served. 

In the News

What Georgia's Failed 'Hack Back' Bill Says About The Future Of Cybersecurity Laws

quoting Herbert Linvia CIO Dive
Tuesday, May 29, 2018

In an age of maturing cyberattacks, risking a hack back may not be worth the emotional gratification.

Interviews

Amy Zegart: Businesses Are Bracing For Political Surprise

by Amy Zegartvia KERA
Thursday, May 17, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Amy Zegart discusses how everything from global conflicts and terrorist actions, to hackers and even individual Twitter users can impact our lives and organizations like never before.

In the News

When Spies Hack Journalism

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia The New York Times
Saturday, May 12, 2018

For decades, leakers of confidential information to the press were a genus that included many species: the government worker infuriated by wrongdoing, the ideologue pushing a particular line, the politico out to savage an opponent. In recent years, technology has helped such leakers operate on a mass scale: Chelsea Manning and the WikiLeaks diplomatic cables, Edward Snowden and the stolen National Security Agency archive, and the still-anonymous source of the Panama Papers.

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Research Team