Terry Anderson

John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow
Biography: 

Terry L. Anderson has been a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution since 1998 and is currently the John and Jean De Nault Senior Fellow. He is the past president of the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, MT, and a Professor Emeritus at Montana State University where he won many teaching awards during his 25 year career.

Anderson is one of the founders of “free market environmentalism,” the idea of using markets and property rights to solve environmental problems, and in 2015 published the third edition of his co-authored book by that title. He is author or editor of 39 books, including most recently, Unlocking the Wealth of Indian Nations (2016), exploring the institutional underpinnings of American Indian reservation economies.

In addition to publishing in professional journals, Terry Anderson speaks around the world and is often featured in the popular press, including frequent editorials in the Wall Street Journal. Dr. Anderson received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 1972 and has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University, Basel University, Clemson University, and Cornell, and a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Canterbury.

Terry is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys fly fishing, hiking, skiing, horseback riding, and archery hunting.

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Recent Commentary

In the News

Fed Court Strikes Down Obama EPA’s Rights-Killing 'Waters Of The US' Rule

quoting Terry Andersonvia MRC TV
Tuesday, September 3, 2019

There are very few good things one can say about Richard Nixon’s monstrous creation, the inaptly labeled “Environmental Protection Agency”. Since given bureaucratic life in 1970, it’s continuing line of edicts and fines have shut down businesses, prevented others from starting, and seen people kill endangered animals rather than have government officials discover them and make their land worthless.

Analysis and Commentary

No More Socialism For Native Americans

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia The Washington Times
Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Elizabeth Warren set a higher bar for wooing the Native American vote by calling for $10 billion in spending to stimulate economic development, build infrastructure and restore tribal sovereignty. She and her fellow Democratic presidential candidates who met with tribal leaders in Sioux City, Iowa, earlier this week, fail to recognize that tribes don’t need more federal grants, they need more revenue.

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Why Here, Why Now? Why Did The United States Enjoy Dramatic Improvements In The Standard Of Living During The Last Century?

interview with John F. Cogan, Lee Ohanian, Terry Anderson, George P. Shultzvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, August 26, 2019

Hoover Institution economists John Cogan, Lee Ohanian, Terry Anderson, and George Shultz examine the causes for and the reasons behind so many improvements being made to the quality of life in the United States over the past century. They analyze the role that free markets, property rights, innovation, regulation, taxes, and national security played in these remarkable achievements.

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Why Here, Why Now? Why Did The United States Enjoy Dramatic Improvements In The Standard Of Living During The Last Century?

interview with Terry Anderson, John F. Cogan, Lee Ohanian, George P. Shultzvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, August 26, 2019

Hoover Institution economists John Cogan, Lee Ohanian, Terry Anderson, and George Shultz examine the causes for and the reasons behind so many improvements being made to the quality of life in the United States over the past century. They analyze the role that free markets, property rights, innovation, regulation, taxes, and national security played in these remarkable achievements.

Featured

Reservation Capitalism

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Lance Morgan is the CEO of Ho-Chunk, Inc., a $100 million tribal economic development corporation that employs nearly 400 people. Tribal leaders and entrepreneurs such as Morgan are part of an economic civil rights movement emerging in indigenous communities around the world. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, which owns Ho-Chunk, Inc., started with a casino, then diversified to earn the revenue needed to build the necessary infrastructure for prosperous tribal economies. 

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Native Freedoms

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia Hoover Digest
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Indian tribes once had economies that helped them thrive, not merely survive. They must be allowed to reclaim their economic freedom, re-establish the rule of law, and reassert individual liberties.

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The Bonds Of Colonialism

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia Defining Ideas
Friday, April 26, 2019

American Indians as Wards of the State.

Featured

Hoover Panelists Address Prosperity In The Last 100 Years

featuring George P. Shultz, Terry Anderson, John F. Cogan, Lee Ohanian, Peter M. Robinson, Hoover Institutionvia Stanford Daily
Thursday, April 18, 2019

“If students here could take anything away from this right now — you have no idea how much us old guys up here suffered to make your lives better,” Peter M. Robinson said, as the audience broke into laughter. Robinson’s lighthearted sentiment echoed the more serious issues of standards of living and sustained financial prosperity addressed in the Hoover Institution’s panel discussion on Thursday, the second in a three-part centennial speaker series, A Century of Ideas for a Free Society.

In the News

Lewis Honors College To Host Talk On 'Free Market Environmentalism'

featuring Terry Andersonvia University of Kentucky News
Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Terry Anderson, a senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, will give a talk this week as part of the University of Kentucky Lewis Honors College's Speaker Series.

Featured

United States Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch And Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Champions Of Individual Rights

by Terry Anderson, Wendy Purnellvia Indian Country Today
Monday, April 8, 2019

Justice Ginsburg joined Justice Gorsuch and three other liberal colleagues in supporting the individual rights of the Yakama Nation in the Washington State Department of Licensing v. Cougar Den, Inc taxation case — significant because of her history of opposing tribal sovereignty

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