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In the News

Move To Reinstate Affirmative Action Loses In California

quoting Lanhee J. Chenvia Education Week
Thursday, November 5, 2020

The campaign to reinstate affirmative action in overwhelmingly Democratic California had money, momentum and big-name backers, including Black celebrities Issa Rae and Ava DuVernay, but voters in the most populated state rejected the measure.

In the News

Post-Election Healing: Experts Weigh In On Moving Forward, How To Bridge Divides

quoting Larry Diamondvia ABC 7 News
Thursday, November 5, 2020

When a winner in this historic presidential election is declared, a big question on so many minds and in homes all over the Bay Area has been, how do we address the tension and divides that have been exposed in the last four years?

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GoodFellows: The Best Of All Possible Outcomes?

interview with John H. Cochrane, Niall Ferguson, H. R. McMaster, Bill Whalenvia Fellow Talks
Thursday, November 5, 2020

AUDIO ONLY

With votes still being counted, this much is apparent: the 2020 election didn’t produce a forecasted “blue wave”; radical “woke” ideas are likely dead on arrival in Washington. Hoover senior fellows Niall Ferguson, H.R. McMaster and John Cochrane discuss the message voters sent and the current health of American democracy. Also, Niall Ferguson remembers a fellow Scotsman, Sean Connery, who died last week at the age of 90.

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The Best Of All Possible Outcomes?

with John H. Cochrane, Niall Ferguson, H. R. McMaster, Bill Whalenvia GoodFellows: Conversations From The Hoover Institution
Thursday, November 5, 2020

With votes still being counted, this much is apparent: the 2020 election didn’t produce a forecasted “blue wave”; radical “woke” ideas are likely dead on arrival in Washington. Hoover senior fellows Niall Ferguson, H.R. McMaster and John Cochrane discuss the message voters sent and the current health of American democracy. Also, Niall Ferguson remembers a fellow Scotsman, Sean Connery, who died last week at the age of 90.

In the News

The Health 202: Trump's Pandemic Response Didn't Hurt Him As Much As Democrats Expected

quoting Lanhee J. Chenvia The Washington Post
Thursday, November 5, 2020

Democrats expected the 2020 presidential election would be a referendum on President Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Analysis and CommentaryPolitics

Chen: GOP Exceeds Expectations In Contests For The Senate

by Lanhee J. Chenvia Townhall Review
Thursday, November 5, 2020

We’re still waiting for the dust to settle on this year’s elections, but one thing appears extremely likely: Republicans will retain control of the United States Senate.

FeaturedPolitics

The Disinformationists

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, November 5, 2020

Pollsters were widely wrong in 2016, yet learned nothing about their flawed methodologies. So how do they remain credible after 2020?

Stanford Oval
Analysis and CommentaryPolitics

Campus Still Blue

by John H. Cochrane quoting Alvin Rabushkavia The Grumpy Economist
Thursday, November 5, 2020

California may be secretly libertarian, but not the Stanford campus.  Several thousand faculty, staff, and students who live in Stanford Campus Housing are registered to vote in Stanford’s exclusive 94305 zip code. 

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VDH: Election Revealed Two Sides – Big Media/Big Tech Vs. The People And Donald Trump

featuring Victor Davis Hansonvia PJ Media
Wednesday, November 4, 2020

“I’m worried,” Victor Davis Hanson told Fox News host Tucker Carlson Wednesday after the election.

In the News

‘The Markets Are Being Too Sanguine’ Given The Likelihood Of A Contested Election: Niall Ferguson

quoting Niall Fergusonvia Yahoo
Wednesday, November 4, 2020

The markets rallied on Wednesday on the prospect of a divided Congress and a lower likelihood of tax hikes or regulations. But as Americans await the results of the presidential election, the possibility of a contested outcome is growing likelier by the second.

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