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EconomyFeatured

California Will Spend $23,000 Per Household In 2023 State Budget. What Will Taxpayers Get?

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, May 17, 2022

With a nearly $100 million budget surplus, California governor Gavin Newsom has proposed a $300 billion state budget for the next fiscal year. If adopted by the state legislature, this budget works out to nearly $23,000 in spending per California household and would be about 50 percent larger than the budget from just two years ago. 

In the News

Camilla Cavendish’s Fantasy Dinner: Elon Musk, Cicero And Ayaan Hirsi Ali

featuring Ayaan Hirsi Alivia Financial Times
Tuesday, May 17, 2022

[Subscription Required] A group of people ‘unafraid to say interesting things’ convene at Voltaire’s château in Ferney.

Analysis and Commentary

The Biden Administration’s Assault On Charter Schools

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Almost 40 years ago, the report A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Reform appeared. It documented the failure of public schools to teach the foundational skills and knowledge necessary for a good education.

In the News

Tax Windfall Pushes California’s Budget Surplus To Nearly $100BN

quoting Lee Ohanianvia Financial Times
Tuesday, May 17, 2022

[Subscription Required] California’s projected surplus is higher than the total spending of every US state except for New York and Texas. Much of its extra revenue is thanks to a 13.3 per cent tax on capital gains.

In the News

Senate Hearing Highlights How Single-Payer Will Ration Health Care

quoting Charles Blahousvia The Federalist
Monday, May 16, 2022

The testimony showed a surprising amount of consensus about ‘free’ health care creating a level of demand for care that doctors and hospitals could not meet.

In the News

Employers Are Allowing More Remote Work Days

quoting Steven J. Davisvia Axios
Monday, May 16, 2022

Bosses are coming around to the idea of remote work, at least for part of the week.

In the News

2022 Shortlist

mentioning Andrew Robertsvia Elizabeth Longford Prize for Historical Biography
Monday, May 16, 2022

“The Elizabeth Longford Prize has always cast a wide net over historical biography, paying close attention not only to rulers, politicians and revolutionaries but also to the lives of those who shape history outside the obvious spheres of public life. The 2022 list reflects this emphatically.”

Featured

An Energy-Independent India Requires A Nuclear Revolution

by David C. Mulford, John Rivera-Dirksvia The Hill
Monday, May 16, 2022

With global energy markets roiled by the Russians invading Ukraine and turning off gas supplies to Poland and Bulgaria, and now electricity to Finland, it’s time for every nation to rethink its dependence on foreign energy and its domestic production. 

Featured

Yes, President Trump's Tax Cuts Overachieved – And Tax Revenues Are Higher Than Without The Cut

by David R. Henderson quoting Tyler Goodspeed, Kevin Hassettvia Texas Insider.org
Monday, May 16, 2022

When Congress passed the 2017 tax cut legislation and former President Trump signed it, I predicted that it would work. Cutting the corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent would increase firms’ incentive to invest because they would keep more of their profits. The tax cut brought the U.S. corporate tax rate much closer to that of other developed countries.

In the News

The Democrats’ Abortion Bill Is Not Just Radical. It’s Unconstitutional.

quoting John Yoovia The Washington Post
Friday, May 13, 2022

If Democrats wanted to show how out of touch they are with the American people on abortion, they could have found no better way than voting for the failed Women’s Health Protection Act, the radical bill that would have created a national right to “abort a child,” in President Biden’s turn of phrase, up until the moment of birth.

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